New Book Release: The Link by Karen A. Wyle

 

the Link

 

 

 

Kayla knows whatever her dog knows — but neither knows enough.

The neural connection between Kayla and her dog seems unimportant, until her father’s cryptic message.

Your mother and I are in danger, and I’m afraid that means you are too. I’ve gone into hiding. Don’t try to find me unless I contact you, and don’t let Saffi find me. You and Saffi should go too. Go and hide together.

Kayla doesn’t really trust her father. After all, he left her mother and dragged Kayla off to live in the country. And when Kayla’s mother gave her Saffi, her father somehow won the dog’s loyalty.

But Kayla can’t reach her mother. She has to decide, on her own, what to do. Should she hide in the forest with Saffi? Should she try to find her father? And what danger threatens?

 

 

 

Question marks

 

 

 

Kayla sounds like a troubled child; does she have a mentor?


–Not really. She wasn’t particularly troubled before her parents split up, which happened (probably — not spelled out) a few months before the story starts.

How old is she?

–Sixteen.

Was it difficult writing from a younger point of view?

–I used my 21-year-old daughter as a sounding board and rewrote accordingly.

What’s the relationship like between Kayla and Saffi?

–At first, not as close as one might — and as Kayla did — expect, due to Saffi’s adoration of Kayla’s father, whom Kayla blames for her parents’ separation.

What kind of dog is Saffi? 

–A golden retriever/beagle mix.

Is this a standalone or a new series?

–Standalone

Thanks

–Thank you!




Karen A Wyle

Karen A. Wyle was born a Connecticut Yankee, but eventually settled in Bloomington, Indiana, home of Indiana University. She now considers herself a Hoosier. Wyle’s childhood ambition was to be the youngest ever published novelist. While writing her first novel at age 10, she was mortified to learn that some British upstart had beaten her to the goal at age 9.

Wyle is an appellate attorney, photographer, political junkie, and mother of two daughters. Her voice is the product of almost five decades of reading both literary and genre fiction. It is no doubt also influenced, although she hopes not fatally tainted, by her years of law practice. Her personal history has led her to focus on often-intertwined themes of family, communication, the impossibility of controlling events, and the persistence of unfinished business.

Wyle’s Twitter handle is @KarenAWyle

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

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BOOKS AND BLURBS: WHO A novel of the near future by Karen A. Wyle

 

 

Pages and glowing letters flying out of a book

 

 

 

 

BOOKS AND BLURBS

 

WHO A novel of the near future

by Karen A. Wyle

 

 

 

 

WHO

 

 

 

Goodreads

 

Have they changed their minds? Or have their minds been changed?

Death is no longer the end. Those who prepare, and can afford it, may have their memories and personalities digitally preserved. The digitally stored population can interact with the world of the living, remaining part of their loved ones’ lives. They can even vote.

But digital information has its vulnerabilities.

After the young and vital Thea dies and is stored, her devoted husband Max starts to wonder about changes in her preoccupations and politics. Are they simply the result of the new company she keeps? Or has she been altered without her knowledge and against her will?

And if Thea is no longer herself, what can they do?

 

 

 

 

virtual-reality-1802469_960_720

 

 

 

 

 

 

*How did the concept of this book develop?

I’ve been aware of the concept of digital survival after corporeal death since reading Frederick Pohl’s Heechee Saga, if not before. Following all the public discussion of hacking computer files, I eventually thought of the possibility that digital personalities and memories could be hacked.

This is definitely a scary thought! I’ve read some of Ray Kurzweil’s writings along this line. Cool, but scary. 

 

 

 

 

hacked

 

 

 

 

 

*Tell us about the main character, Thea. 

Thea is a tough and assertive young woman. She’s very creative but also analytical. In the latter respect, she takes after her mother, though the two of them disagree on politics. (Thea leans libertarian.) I wouldn’t call her a romantic, though she is deeply in love with her husband Max. She has a big appetite for experience and sensation.

She sounds like someone I’d like to meet! Thea is also a nice name 🙂

 

 

 

*What is the setting like in WHO?

There are two basic settings: the “real” or corporeal world, and the digital environment LiveAfter provides its clients. The latter lacks variety and interest, though this may be corrected eventually. I tried to create a contrast between the vivid sensory detail of our world and the digital alternative.

I believe settings matter a lot in stories to cement the reader and deepen the storyline. This one sounds marvelous!

 

 

 

 

*Tell us about the technology employed in your book. 

Clients are given a liquid filled with nanoparticles that travel throughout the nervous system. They are then put through very detailed scans that rely on the nanoparticles to map neural pathways and connections. That data is used to create virtual files of the client’s personality and memories. After the initial baseline data collection, clients can come in for subsequent scans to update their files.

It’s amazing what they’re able to do with nanoparticles. What will they come up next! 

 

 

 

 

 

Nerve cell

 

 

 

 

*Can you tell us something about WHO that we wouldn’t know by reading the book?

You wouldn’t know about a disgusting slob of a hacker who figured in the story until fairly late in the revision process.

You might not realize how much I didn’t already know, and had to learn, about federal court procedure in general and class actions in particular.

You might not know how much of the plot I made up as I went along. I’m what some writers call a “pantser,” meaning I fly by the seat of my pants – at the rough draft stage at least — rather than planning ahead in detail.

Learning is always a good thing, eh? That’s one thing I like about reading and being a writer—You get to learn all manner of things. 

 

 

 

*What did you learn from researching the technology?

One of my beta readers, who’s an expert on software and related technologies, educated me about what machine-generated code would look like and how it would differ from code a human would write. He also shared with me a few basics about subroutines.

Wow. I didn’t know machine generate codes at all. That’s amazing. 

 

 

 

 

code

 

 

 

 

*Do you think there’s a  futuristic possibility of digitizing memories and personalities?

Assuming no catastrophic descent into a pre-technological era, I’d call it (pun intended) a virtual certainty.

Yikes! Digitizing memories or personalities definitely hard to fathom at this point, but I wouldn’t be surprised when we get there!

 

 

 

 

memories

 

 

 

 

THANKS

 

 

 

Connect with Karen!

Goodreads | Website | Facebook |

Amazon

 

 

 

Thanks for riding the Train folks!! Don’t be a stranger!

 

 

 

Waving bye

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com