How to Run an Indie Author Business via Self Publishing Formula

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

 

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How to Run an Indie Author Business (The Self Publishing Show, episode 182)

 

 

 

selfpublishingformula.com

Transcript and Show Notes

The Business of Writing Handout

 

 

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Writing Romance: The Importance of Rapid Release with Rosalind James

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Writing Romance: The Importance of Rapid Release (The Self Publishing Show, episode 180)

 

 

 

Show Notes

  • Why write romance novels about rugby?
  • Writing a first novel in her 50s
  • Changing to a new series to keep the writing interesting for the writer
  • The importance of character development and tone
  • What is it that your books offer readers, other than plot?
  • The importance of knowing your ‘why’

 

Full Transcript

Selfpublishingformula.com

 

 

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Driving Non-Fiction Book Sales with Amazon ads

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

 

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Driving Non-Fiction Book Sales with Amazon ads (The Self Publishing Show, episode 179)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Keeping It Clean With Post-Apocalyptic Fiction

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

 

 

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Keeping It Clean With Post-Apocalyptic Fiction (The Self Publishing Show, episode 178)

 

 

 

 

 

SelfPublishingformula.com

 

 

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Writing Memoir And Marketing Under A New Author Pen Name With Toby Neal

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Writing Memoir And Marketing Under A New Author Pen Name With Toby Neal

 

 

 

 

 

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Toby Neal was raised on Kauai in Hawaii. She wrote and illustrated her first story at age 5. After initially majoring in journalism, she eventually settled on mental health as a career and loves her work, saying, “I’m endlessly fascinated with people’s stories.”

Toby credits her counseling background in adding depth to her characters–from the villains to Lei Texeira, the courageous and vulnerable heroine in the Lei Crime Series, to the wounds and psychological implications of the heroes of the Scorch Series.

 

Website | Twitter | Goodreads | Amazon

 

 

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Writing Conflict In Crime Fiction With Detective Adam Richardson

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Writing Conflict In Crime Fiction With Detective Adam Richardson

 

 

 

 

 

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Want to write a crime-fiction story but not sure where to start? Are you between drafts and feeling stuck? Do you feel that you just don’t know enough about police work to write a believable police detective protagonist?

In this conversational and fact-filled handbook, veteran police detective Adam Richardson answers the criminal investigation questions most frequently asked by authors and screenwriters. Unlike many other writing guides about “the cop stuff,” the Writer’s Detective Handbook addresses police procedure and criminal investigation from the storyteller’s perspective.

The Writer’s Detective Handbook: Criminal Investigation for Authors and Screenwriters equips storytellers with the ability to tell a great story while keeping the police-work aspects believable. Reading this book will empower you to write the crime-fiction story you’ve been dying to tell!

 

Available August 18, 2019 Preorder now

 

www.writersdetective.com

Writer”s Detective Bureau Facebook Community

 

 

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The Importance of Setting in Historical Fiction

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I had opportunity to interview some great historical mystery writers, asking them about the importance of setting; Denise Domning, Lee Strauss, and Rhys Bowen. Here’s what they said…

 

From Denise Domning author of The Servant of the Crown series.

 

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How important is setting in historical fiction versus the setting in other genres?

I can’t say that setting is any more or less important to historical fiction than any other genre as every genre has its conventions. What makes or breaks a novel is how deft an author is at conveying the expected milieu. In that, historical fiction can be unforgiving. Readers who love this genre already know their history. Beware the author who doesn’t check her facts for she will suffer the slings and arrows of critics who remind her that sycamores are an American tree and potatoes come from the New World. For the record, neither of those were my errors but I have heard from readers protesting facts that in other genres would be deemed unworthy of comment.

In historical fiction it’s not enough to be comfortable with the details of your chosen time period. You also have to get that information from your brain through your fingers and into the book in a way that doesn’t stop the flow. For me that requires writing out all the details I think I’ll need for a particular scene, say a meal in a merchant’s house. How many tables are there and how are they set? What’s on the floor? Where are the windows, if there are windows? Is there a newfangled chimney or is there a central hearth? What colors/designs are painted on the walls? What

furniture might there be besides the tables? Is there crockery? How does it smell? What sounds fill the air from nearby homes or their own workshops? Are they close enough to hear the bells from the nearest church? Are there regraters outside in the street selling goods? Is the neighboring merchant shouting out to passers-by about his wares?

Once I’ve answered those questions, I go back and tighten, tighten, tighten, eliminating this, shortening that, until there are just enough details to describe the scene without slowing the action. This is very hard to do for someone who writes history textbooks disguised as novels to educate unsuspecting readers. I want to share every cool fact I’ve learned. To protect my readers, I employ this mantra: “If I love it, take it out.”

 

 

From Lee Strauss author of the Ginger Gold and Higgins & Hawke mystery series.  

 

Murder aboard the flying scotsman Ginger goldMurder at the boat club Ginger gold

 

 

*How important is the setting in historical mysteries?

I would say very. The historical backdrop is almost like a character in itself. Readers love the details and historical trivia. Otherwise, you might as well stick to a contemporary setting.

 

 

From  Rhys Bowen author of the Royal Spyness mystery series.

 

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How important is setting for historical fiction writers?

Rhys: for me setting drives many of my stories. NAUGHTY IN NICE. TIME OF FOG AND FIRE. Etc etc

And it’s important to get every detail right. I read biographies, accounts of battles, diaries, study old maps.

 

Rhys Bowen

Lee Strauss

Denise Domning

 

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Pinterest and Instagram for Writers with Frances Caballo

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

 

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Pinterest and Instagram for Writers with Frances Caballo

 

 

 

 

Social Media in 30 minutes a day Frances Caballo

 

 

What if you no longer had to worry that social media marketing would take hours, leaving you with less time to focus on your writing?

Social Media in 30 Minutes a Day provides a formula that authors can follow to help them save time online without losing their effectiveness or impact.

In just eleven chapters, Frances Caballo helps writers:

implement the same four-step formula that she uses every day
understand the new formula for saving time online
learn how to become a more effective and efficient marketer
learn about hashtags, buzz words, and social media’s lexicon
discover apps that can help writers save time while using social media
use the best tips and best practices you need to know to successfully market your book and blog

If you’ve avoided social media because you felt that you didn’t have enough time for it, you’ve used it sporadically, or you’ve been frustrated by how much time social media networking takes, this book is for you.

Once you read this book, you’ll never waste time online again.

 

Amazon | Goodreads

 

 

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Frances Caballo is an author and social media strategist and manager for writers. She’s a regular speaker at the San Francisco Writers Conference. In addition, she’s a contributing writer at TheBookDesigner.com, and blogger and Social Media Expert for BookWorks.

She’s written several social media books including The Author’s Guide to Goodreads, Social Media Just for Writers, and Social Media in 30 Minutes a Day. Her focus is on helping authors surmount the barriers that keep them from flourishing online, building their platform, finding new readers, and selling more books. Her clients include authors of every genre and writers’ conferences. Not sure how you’re doing online? Sign up for her free email course at www.SocialMediaJustforWriters.com 

 

 

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How to be a Productive Author

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How to be a Productive Author (The Self Publishing Show, episode 172)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

PATREON: Self Publishing Formula Show’s Patreon page

SURVEY: Give us your opinions about a possible live SPF event in 2020

From selfpublishingformula.com

 

 

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How to Sell More Books Through Reader Engagement

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How to Sell More Books Through Reader Engagement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selfpublishingformula.com

HANDOUT: Five Ways to Immediately Connect with Readers courtesy of Dan Blank

 

 

 

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