Discussing The Strange Luck Series with Amie Irene Winters

 

 

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Strange Luck #1

 

 

 

 

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Strange Luck #2

 

 

 

 

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Strange Luck #3

 

 

 

 

 

Q&A

 

 

 

Where you a reader growing up?

Not so much. The main reason was because of the types of books that I was allowed to read. They weren’t very interesting, well-known, and almost all were religious. I dreaded reading because of this. It wasn’t until I was older that I discovered that not all books were dull and boring.
I remember that when I got my license, I regularly drove to Barnes & Noble to buy books (most in secret). Classics, poetry, non-fiction—I devoured all of them with enthusiasm.
Although I would have loved to read Harry Potter and The Chronicles of Narnia growing up, I think being deprived of good books has made me that much more appreciative of them today. I can’t imagine my life without reading now.

Same here. I’m glad you had a wonderful discovery later in life. Too many great books!

 

 

 

 

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Was there anything in your background that influenced you to write later in life?



Reading the book Chocolat in college. It was the first time I had ever read a book that was filled with magic and whimsy. This launched my obsession with magical realism books, which led to my obsession with books about witches, which led to my obsession with fantasy books.

Nice. Once you read something you like, you’re hooked. 

 

 

 

~Reading is for awesome people~

 

 

 
Why did you choose fantasy for a debut novel?



Fantasy is my favorite genre to read because of the limitless possibilities. I love visiting other worlds. I love magic and supernatural entities. I love exploring things that I am afraid of. It seemed only fitting to write in the genre I love most.

Great! Limitless possibilities is fascinating! 

 

What made you move from California to Pennsylvania?

My husband teaches philosophy and got a position at a local university. Prior to PA, we lived in Florida and Colorado.
PA is my favorite place I’ve lived so far though. I absolutely love the seasons, especially fall. I also prefer living in a small country town versus a big bustling city.

Nice. There’s a certain kind of peace out in the countryside. 

 

 

 

 

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Describe the decision to write a book after other job opportunities.



Creative writing was my favorite subject in grade school, but once I went to college and began to explore various job opportunities, writing fell by the wayside.
I eventually went on to work in corporate America and was miserable, so I started writing stories again as a way for me to relax from the grind.
It didn’t take me long to spark the passion I had lost for writing. I looked forward to my hobby at every opportunity. After I published my first book, Strange Luck, I knew that I wanted to dedicate my life to writing. Just as Chocolat inspired me, I can only hope that my books will do the same for my readers.

Ohhh. I can totally relate to this. 

 

 

Who is Daisy Darling and how do you relate to her?

Daisy Darling is a stubborn, quirky girl who wants to be a writer, but things keep getting in the way. She inherits her family’s antique shop, ends up in a mysterious world where her memories are stolen, and then accidentally becomes ringleader for an ancient and evil theater.
Many of Daisy’s quirks are similar to mine, and some of her experiences are based on things that have happened to me.

Cool. 

 
You can learn more here:

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Strange Luck

10 Things You Didn’t Know About The Nightmare Birds

 

Does she have a mentor that she confides in?



In each book, Daisy has a mentor that helps guide her. In Strange Luck, it was a time-traveling wizard. In The Nightmare Birds, it was a beautiful and immortal performer, but in A Darling Secret, Daisy finally learns how to harness her own strengths and therefore relies only on herself.

I like the progression here. 

 
Tell us about the upcoming release of A Darling Secret.

A Darling Secret is the conclusion to the series, where you’ll learn the fate of your favorite heroes and love-to- hate foes. It’s a little darker than The Nightmare Birds, with lots of occult themes, magic, and psychological games. My favorite! ��
I wanted this book to answer remaining questions and leave the reader with a satisfying sense of completion. I spent a lot of time talking to my readers to find out what they wanted to see happen, which characters they wanted to see more of, and what they liked most about the previous books. I hope my readers will enjoy the result.

Awesome. I love that you seek out feedback from your readers. 

 

 

 
What have you learned after writing your third book?

The more you write, the better you become at writing.

Amen to that. It’s simple yet profound.  

 

 

 

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Do you outline or construct character arcs?

When I write, I don’t plot everything out in advance. I have a very general idea of what I’m going to do and the rest I come up with as I go. For example, I wanted to write a book about a world built using stolen memories. That was the general idea I had for Strange Luck. The rest took form as I wrote. A lot of the time I don’t even know what is going to happen in the story or to my characters, but that’s part of the fun. All the themes I discuss in my books are important to me and are largely based on my own experiences/thoughts, like how we are our memories.

Exploring the plot as you go does sound interesting. 

 

What’s next after the Strange Luck series?

I plan to write a standalone psychological horror novel. Details to come.

Oh, do share when available. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bio:

 

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Amie Irene Winters was born and raised in California but now lives and writes in western Pennsylvania. She is the author of the award-winning Strange Luck series.
When not writing, she can be found hiking with her dog, baking desserts, or breaking a sweat in kickboxing class.

To learn more about Amie and her books, visit amieirenewinters.com.

 

 

Connect:

Website
Blog

Facebook

Twitter

 

 

Buy Links:

Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Book Depository

Books-A-Million

 

 

 

Don’t be a stranger! Come back and see us!

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

@MTW_2018

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

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The Story of Author Anna Patrick

 

 

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WELCOME ANNA!

 

 

Here we are with another story to tell.

So who is Anna Patrick? Well, let’s find out.

 

 

 

 

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So her story begins…

 

 

 

 

*Are you originally from Northern Virginia?

Yes, born in raised in the suburbs of Northern Virginia, outside of DC.

Ive never been to northern Virginia before. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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*What do you do currently in your occupation?

I’m a Communications Associate for The Kennedy Forum, a mental health advocacy non-profit founded by Patrick Kennedy – his book, A Common Struggle, is a great read if you haven’t checked it out yet!

 Nice. Thanks for the book recommendation!

 

 

 

 

“Books are mirrors: you only see in them what you already have inside you.”

 

 

 

 

 

*Did you have a childhood fascination with fairy tales? Tell us about it and your all time favorites.

I don’t think it’s so much fairy tales, but just darker stories in general. I loved Alice In Wonderland, of course, and poetry by Edgar Allan Poe. Not your average childhood reads, but I think I had such an idyllic childhood that the dark and edgy stories captured my interest.

 That makes sense. I’ve read some of Poe’s work, but now enough.

 

 

 

 

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*What genre do you write?

Fiction. Leaning toward the magical surrealist side. I think the creative possibilities there are endless, and that intrigues me.

 Can’t wait to see what you come up with!

 

 

 

 

 

“Imagination is the reality of the dreamer.” -Scott Ringenback

 

 

 

 

 

*Have you always wanted to be a writer?

I read a quote recently that said something like look to your childhood passions to see where your life calling lies. I’ve always written, and I think when I reached an age where you start to question what you want to do, becoming an author seemed like a natural goal for me.

 I love that quote! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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*Where did you go to school? Major?

I went to Boston College and majored in Communications. I wrote Meditations In Wonderland there my last semester.

 Wow. That sounds like a major feat. Penning a novel in your last semester of college is remarkable. 

 

 

 

 

 

*What led you to write Meditations in Wonderland? Your premise looks pretty intriguing.

Thank you! I grew up loving Alice In Wonderland, and I was inspired by the dark tones it took on over the years as my generation grew with the story. From that landscape my story manifested itself in my mind over a few years, primarily starting when I studied abroad in London, saw Lewis Carroll’s original manuscript and visited Oxford, through to my senior year of college when I finally wrote it. It’s been called Pretty Little Liars meets Alice In Wonderland.”

 

Never been to Oxford, but Cambridge is beautiful. 

 

 

 

 

 

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*Would it be classified as a psychological thriller?

I can definitely see an argument for that. As a dark Alice In Wonderland retelling I think no one would dispute that. It definitely has a lot of thriller-esque scenes and notes of magical surrealism. And, of course, a little nonsense.

 It’s amazing to see what different authors are able to craft with their imagination. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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*Tell us a little about the main character.

Elizabeth is 24, and she lives in Brooklyn and works as an interior designer in the city. I think many people can relate to the themes she’s struggling with – confronting and acknowledging the darker sides of herself, struggling with mental static and getting lost in the noise. In a sense she has to reclaim herself after giving in to a pattern of self-destructive behavior. She meditates, falls down the rabbit hole, and the rest is history.

 

Wow. Makes me want to know more about her.

 

 

 

 

 

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You’re a writer; so whats your story, or what inspired you?

I don’t think I can pinpoint a single moment when I decided that I would be a writer – I’ve always just written, and then I couldn’t separate myself from the act of writing, it always felt a part of me. I used to carry around a composition notebook in elementary school that housed my first “novel,” scribbled in mechanical pencil between classes and after school, and eventually I graduated to my MacBook in college on which I wrote the manuscript for Meditations In Wonderland my last semester at Boston College. In terms of inspiration, I just follow that internal whisper that compels me to return to the blank page time and time again.

 

Keep following that internal whisper. And when you don’t hear it, write anyway.

 

 

 

 

 

“In terms of inspiration, I just follow that internal whisper that compels me to return to the blank page time and time again.”-Anna Patrick

 

 

 

 

 

What’s your GOAL in becoming a writer?

Having my writing published has always been the “ultimate” goal for me, and I think many writers can relate to that, however I think a more realistic goal is just to keep writing, to keep the process alive. The hardest part about writing, in truth, is the act of sitting down to write in the first place. If I can cultivate and keep my writing practice going, that’s a goal in itself that I think leads to the more penultimate dream of having your work published.

YES. I love this. The more realistic goal is to keep writing. I struggle with having consistent writing time so I completely understand this. The ‘butt in chair’ is the only way. 

 

 

 

 

 

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What 3 things have hindered you from completing your projects? (CONFLICT)

Timing, spaces, and disconnect. As for the first, why is it when you’re about to shut your eyes and fall asleep, warm under the covers, does your muse begin to speak? I think mine might be a sadist in that way. So the first conflict for me is the timing of writing, capturing what I need to capture often against difficult circumstances for doing so, like commuting, unplugging for a night’s sleep, or while on a run. As for the second, my writing practice benefits from having a clean, creative space to work in with minimal distractions from my “to do” list, which is probably why I wrote my first novel out of my home in a local Barnes & Noble. Last, disconnect is often a gatekeeper I grapple with. Either feeling disconnected from the story, from myself, from my creative process, or just from the voice that compels me to pick up where I left off. Some days you’re just not “feeling it,” so to speak, and I think writers can all commiserate there. The goal is to at least try to make sure two out of the three are at bay on any given day to try to make writing happen, and keep it cohesive!

The writing process is so mysterious to me. Not sure if you’ve read Anne Janzer’s book , The Writing Process, but I was greatly helped by it. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What keeps you motivated in achieving your dream? (DESIRE)

If the story needs to be told, I’ll continue to tell it. When I don’t feel that ache in my bones to keep writing, I’ll stop, but I still have that voice that refuses to stop whispering.

Stories are great and equally mysterious. 

 

 

 

What’s your ANTAGONIST? What’s in the way?

Aren’t all of the best antagonists just reflections of ourselves, or our greatest fears? The fear that any next novel wouldn’t live up to the first, or that those new daring stylistic choices won’t engage the reader the way we hoped they would – we all have our dragon at that gate. For me, it’s scales are green, shiny, and coated with that existential “if I finish this, I have to turn it over to the business side of things” doubts. Writing is the fun part, but I think it’s important to embrace every part of the process, even the parts that we might rather procrastinate in facing.

Well spoken. It’s always a constant battle. Let’s keep at it, shall we?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Why do writers give up, quit or never complete their projects?

I think leaving a project is a very personal choice, so the reasons could be many. The best reason is probably because the project no longer feels authentic, which I think is a noble reason to step away, and faced with the same reality I hope I have the courage to do the same if it frees me up for the better project waiting in the shadows!

Seeing the next project is always tempting!

 

 

 

What would you say to a struggling writer who’s given up?

Take your time away, if you need it, and return to it when you feel compelled, nagged, and eaten away to resume. Because then you’ll really enjoy it, and your reader will feel that, too.

For me, it’s a gut feeling. If I stop, then it returns begging to be written.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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BONUS: What else do you have coming down the pike? 

I’ve been playing around with a sequel to my next novel, loosely based off of Through The Looking Glass, as Meditations In Wonderland was loosely based of Lewis Carrol’s Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland.

 

Keep us posted on the release date! 

 

 

 

 

Thanks Anna!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Goodreads | Amazon | Twitter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for ridin’ the train!!

 

 

 

 

 

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Don’t be a stranger….

 

 

 

 

 

 

Up for a reading challenge? Join the Book Hoarders Bucket List Reading Challenge  (Goodreads group here)

 

 

A Challenge for Book Hoarders Like Me at SallyAllenBooks.com

 

 

Don’t miss the inaugural powerhouse event of 2017!! Check out Mystery Thriller Week on my other site: Mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.thewritingtrain.com

 

 

Burned by Fire Book Tour with Author Danielle Annett

Burned by Fire

Blood and Magic #3

Genres: New Adult, Urban Fantasy, Magic, Vampires

Publication date: September 30th 2016

 

 

 

 

Aria’s pyrokinetic ability has always been hard to control, and being pulled in so many directions, isn’t making it any easier.

Now she has to help Inarus, a foe turned friend who is being targeted by the Human Alliance Corporation-the very organization he once worked for.

But the HAC has more than just Inarus in their sights. Aria finds herself going deep into enemy territory to save a witchling child with never before seen powers, that the HAC has kidnapped to further their own ends.

Aria has been hired to save a child once before, and she failed. That failure has haunted her even to this day and she wonnt let herself fail again. With the HAC closing in, and complications between herself and the Pack rising, Aria has no choice but to succeed. A child’s life is on the line and Aria will risk everything to save that life.

 

 

 

Add to Goodreads

Buy links: Amazon Kobo

 

 

 

 

There’s nothing like the imagination of a buddinig writer. Author Danielle Annett does a great job conveying her characters in the midst of dynamic relationships and navigating through dire circumstances. I’ve always appreciated the cast that surrounds the main character. To me, it always brings out the best fiction in any story. Aria has good intentions, but struggles to contorol her pyrokinetic abilities. Because of her lack of control, and apparent weakness, she’s become dependent upon her Alpha mate, Declan. This forces her to deal with her mixed feelings about him, her friend Inarus, is caught up right in the middle of it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

My rating

 

Four golden stars isolated on white background

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Author Biography

Danielle Annett is a reader, writer, photographer, and blogger. Born in the SF Bay area, she now resides in Spokane, WA, the primary location for her Blood & Magic series. Addicted to coffee at an early age, she spends her restless nights putting pen to paper as she tries to get all of the stories out of her head before the dogs wake up the rest of the house and vye for her attention

 

Website Facebook

 

 

 

Thank you Bookmark booktours and Danielle!

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.thewritingtrain.com

The Crown of Stones Trilogy by Fantasy Author C.L. Schneider

 

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PLEASE WELCOME ONE AWESOME FANTASY AUTHOR

C.L. SCHNEIDER

 

 

 

 

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C.L. Schneider is an author mom who just penned her first published work, The Crown of Stones. The first in a trilogy, Magic-Price is a gripping account of one man’s struggle to accept who and what he is. It’s the journey of a flawed hero, a fallen race, and a land at war. A page-turning tale of prejudice, betrayal, secrets and lies.

 

 

 

*It sounds absolutely and deliciously scrumptious!*

 

 

 

 

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GULP…

 

 

 

 

 

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THE CROWN OF STONES

 

 

 

 

 

*How long did you live in Kansas?

I was born and raised in Atchison, Kansas, a small town on the Missouri river. Atchison is the birthplace of Amelia Earhart. It is also considered the most haunted small town in Kansas. I came to New York after I finished school and have lived in the same general area (the Hudson Valley region) ever since.

Haunted small towns, eh? Just in time for Halloween!

 

 

 

 

 

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*What sorts of books did you read growing up?

I come from a family of readers, all with different interests, so the bookshelves in my house were bursting with books from all genres. I was an early reader. In elementary school I devoured my older sibling’s collections of Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys, but by the time I was in middle school I was reading a lot of the classics. Some of my favorites were: Gone with the Wind, Jane Eyre, Rebecca, Frankenstein, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Northwest Passage, The Time Machine. I loved mysteries and gothic novels. From there, I moved onto historical fiction and horror. I didn’t start reading fantasy until after high school when my brother bought me a copy of The Mists of Avalon. I fell in love and read it twice within a couple of months. I had already finished my first novel at that point, but that book changed everything for me. It narrowed my writing focus. Once I read Mists of Avalon, I knew fantasy was my genre.

That’s an interesting mix of books there! It intrigues me how certain books can have a particular affect on us. In your case it was The Mists of Avalon. 

 

 

 

 

The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.-Dr. Seuss

 

 

 

 

*Who were your favorite characters growing up, and how did you relate to them?

I adored Scarlett O’Hara. She was such an amazing character. On the surface she was this incredibly strong woman who let nothing stand in her way. She knew how to work the system to get what she wanted. Yet underneath, she was vulnerable. Scarlett O’Hara was the first truly flawed character that I ever encountered and she definitely set the bar high. I was also drawn to Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights. To me, at the time, he was the epitome of a tortured character. I loved his passion and recklessness.

YESSSS. Flawed characters are the name of the game. It’s amazing how we’re touched by them isn’t it?

 

 

 

 

 

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*What’s your educational background?

I’ve had no formal writing education. Writing is just something I’ve done for as long as I can remember.

Me neither!! Hah! But you’re trilogy looks AMAZING. The reviews I’ve seen are also very astounding. Impressive for someone who has no formal background in writing. You’re an encouragement for the rest of us!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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*Who are you favorite characters today and how do you relate to them?

One of my favorite characters that I’ve discovered recently is Mason Stone from the Saint Monolith series by fellow indie author Tom Reinhart. Mason Stone is such a compelling character. He’s an unsung hero, a loose cannon vigilante, a tortured man, and a very lost soul. I can’t say that I relate to him, really, but I admire how he doesn’t hold back. He does the things that everyone else wishes they could.

Hmm…I haven’t heard of him, but I’ll check him out! 

 

 

 

*Tell us about Ian Troy and how you crafted him.

There is a quote by Kahlil Gibran that I believe describes Ian Troy perfectly: “Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls; the most massive characters are seared with scars.” That is Ian Troy. 

Ian is an anti-hero, flawed as they come. He’s solder, a magic user, a drinker, a smart-ass, and an outcast who’s maddeningly stubborn and guilt ridden. Ian’s story is a dark one, and he goes to some very dark places. He doesn’t always do the right thing. In fact, he does some very bad things. But you can always count on him to be selfless in the face of danger and put other’s lives ahead of his own. How did he get to be this way? Over the course of the trilogy, you learn about the roller coaster of his life and how he was manipulated and coerced even before he was born.

I love flawed characters. The more flawed they are, the more opportunities they have to incite emotions in a reader. Flawed characters, to me, are far more interesting that the gallant white knights and the perfect super heroes. Those are fine, to a point. But I’m far more intrigued by what’s underneath the shining armor and the mask. What trials and tribulations did they have to endure? What past mistakes or secret desires are they hiding?

When I created Ian Troy, I set out to construct a character that I, as a reader, would want to get lost in. It was important to me that Ian carried traits from some of the characters that sparked my imagination growing up. I wanted him to be a cowboy and an outlaw, a good guy and a rogue; a detective when he needed to be, a monster when he could help it, and a hero even when he tried not to be. I knew his story would revolve around magic. That he would be flawed and suffering, bold yet strong, valiant yet broken. To me, the best way to create and explore a tortured character was to make his greatest strength (magic) also his greatest weakness.

I love, love, love your description of your characters and your entire premise. 

 

 

 

 

 

“Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls; the most massive characters are seared with scars.”- Kahlil Gibran

 

 

 

*What do you love most about him?

I love Ian’s strength, his ability to keep going, to keep striving for what he knows is right even against terrible odds. It probably sounds strange, but when I’m faced with a difficult task and I feel like giving up, I think: Ian wouldn’t give up, and it pushes me to keep going.

Now that’s awesome. You’re inspired by your own character! That’s heroism at its best.

 

 

 

 

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*If you were to meet him in person how would you feel?

Oh, I’m not sure! No one has ever asked me that before. I might feel a little star struck, actually. Though, I would love to find out. It would be amazing to have the opportunity to sit down with Ian and the gang at one of the taverns in my book and share a bottle. That would be a fun night!

I can almost picture this playing out in my head, lol!  That would be EPIC.

 

 

 

*What did you enjoy most in writing the Crown of Stones Trilogy?

Worldbuilding was definitely one of my favorite parts of writing The Crown of Stones. I loved forming all those realms and crafting their history. Taking the flaws and accomplishments (and the secrets) of each society and interweaving them together over the three books was so much fun. Mirra’kelan is a world I’m proud of. I think it has a lot of potential for future stories.

I also thoroughly enjoyed the characters. One of the hardest parts of moving onto a new project was letting them go.

Yeah, that sounds like it would be pretty hard. Having to let them go and move on would be tough.

 

 

 

 

 

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*What exactly is Epic Fantasy?

Epic fantasy is generally described as a novel set in an entirely imaginary world, completely unlike our own, with environments and societies that are fully explored and realized. As a rule, the story is lengthy and often evolves over multiple books. It frequently includes a large cast of characters, complex magic systems, sweeping battles, and/or a journey across multiple realms. The plot is complex and game-changing, leaving the story-world altered on a grand scale and the characters evolved.

I like it. Just realized my story sounds a lot like epic fantasy. 

 

 

*What is Urban Fantasy?

With urban fantasy, the magical/supernatural elements are still there, but story generally takes place in more of a contemporary, urban setting than epic fantasy.

I wonder what is it if your story has both elements of Urban and Epic fantasy? Interesting. 

 

 

 

 

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*Can you give us a teaser about your next book?

My next book, Nite Fire, is the first in an urban fantasy series. It’s the story of Dahlia Nite, a half-dragon shapeshifter from a parallel world very different from our own. Many years ago, Dahlia’s emerging empathic abilities interfered with her job as an assassin. She failed the dragon queen, Naalish, and was condemned to die. Being half human (and able to shift into human form), Dahlia fled her home for the only other world where she had a hope of blending in: ours.

Nite Fire is set in the fictitious Sentinel City. Already a hot-spot for the unexplained, when a series of brutal killings disguised as spontaneous combustion strike the city, Dahlia knows the killer is one of her own kind. She worms her way into the investigation, teaming up with a human detective to solve the case, while struggling to maintain the lies that have kept humanity in the dark for centuries; believing myths and legends were just that.

As Dahlia searches for the truth behind the murders, the bit of peace she’s found in this world starts to unravel. Nite Fire is the first book in a series. An early excerpt is posted on my website on the Playground page Nite Fire Play if you’d like to have a look! Leave a comment, too. I’d love to hear what you think of it.

 

You really now how to craft a story with intriguing characters! Please drop me a line when you finish. I’d be open to review it. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Connect with C.L. Schneider!

Twitter | Facebook | Google | Goodreads | Amazon | Website

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for ridin’ the train folks!!

 

 

 

 

 

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When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature. -Ernest Miller Hemingway

 

 

 

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To write well, express yourself like the common people, but think like a wise man. -Aristotle

 

 

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“When I want to read a novel, I write one.” -Benjamin Disraeli

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t be a stranger…

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.thewritingtrain.com

Let’s Talk Fantasy with Author Joshua Robertson

 

 

LETS TALK FANTASY

WITH TALENTED AUTHOR JOSHUA ROBERTSON

 

 

 

 

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Joshua Robertson was born in Kingman, Kansas on May 23, 1984. A graduate of Norwich High School, Robertson attended Wichita State University where he received his Masters in Social Work with minors in Psychology and Sociology. His bestselling novel, Melkorka, the first in The Kaelandur Series, was released in 2015. Known most for his Thrice Nine Legends Saga, Robertson enjoys an ever-expanding and extremely loyal following of readers. He counts R.A. Salvatore and J.R.R. Tolkien among his literary influences.

www.crimsonedgepress.com
www.facebook.com/AuthorJoshuaRobertson
@robertsonwrites

 

 

WELCOME!

 

 

 

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THE KAELANDUR SERIES

 

 

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Melkorka, the first in The Kaelandur Series

 

 

 

 

 

dyndaer

 

 

Dyndaer, the second in the Kaelandur Series

 

 

 

 

 

anaerfell

 

 

Anaerfell

 

 

 

 

*What is your definition of fantasy?
My definition of fantasy literature does not drift too far from the typical explanation. Fantasy must have supernatural elements in the theme, setting, or plot of the story. Some writers like to include magic, and others may have a simple make-believe worlds to play inside. Regardless, I think fantasy should take a reader on an adventure they cannot experience anywhere else.
They always say simplicity is bliss. I love this definition. 
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*What are your favorite elements that make a great fantasy book?
Likely, the same thing as most good novels, but most of all, it must have dynamic characters. Fantasy has shown promise with the rise of books that drift away from the dichotomy of good and evil, and really explore the motivations of the protagonist and antagonist. In this way, we see multi-faced characters who have mixed elements of right and wrong, which makes a much more believable story…in a fantastical world.
Yes, I’m hearing this more and more. We tend to be drawn more to characters that seem to blur the lines between good and evil. 
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*How were you influenced by RA Salvatore & JRR Tolkien? 
Tolkien I started reading around the age of 13 or 14, and continued re-reading through the course of my high school career. We know how impressionable the mind of a teenager can be…and I was a sponge for his words, characters, and philosophy. A couple years after reading Tolkien, I delved into many other great writers, such as Salvatore. The man’s description of battles were so real, I often finished the book with a serious sense of awe. Nowadays, after having a few interactions with Salvatore, I also admire his kindness, straightforwardness, and humanness.
That’s awesome. I love hearing about this, the impression that authors make upon readers in their early years. I guess you never know how your words might affect others!
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*Does fantasy have to include magic to be successful?
Absolutely not. I have read many great stories without a hint of magic that were exceptional and stuck with me. I think the quality of a book is measured by the impression it has on your life after you have put it down. Without a doubt, you can achieve this without having magic included, even in fantasy literature.
Wonderful! My project is somewhat of a science fiction fantasy mashup, but without magic. I have several fantastical elements within it though. 
*What are your favorite creatures?
Strangely enough, even as a Tolkien fan, I am not a huge fan of Tolkien creatures. In fact, the only time I really delve into elves, dwarves, etc., is when I am reading Tolkien, or playing a good ole’ game of Dungeons and Dragons. If I had to choose a favorite fantasy creature on the spot, it would be a dryad. Though, I have never considered writing a story focusing on their kind. I don’t think I could do it justice.
I’ve often thought of crafting my own creatures rather than going along with the norm. Never even heard of a dryad. Trolls are pretty cool too.
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*Tell us about Anaerfell
Anaerfell is a dark fantasy tale about two brothers who are trapped beneath the ambitions of their father. Drast and Tyran were raised in a harsh home, offering them little grace and even less love. As a result, you see two grown men who are haunted by their own psychological and emotional demons, struggling to make the ‘right’ decisions. The story unfolds as their father sends them on a journey to kill the God of the Dead in hopes it will grant him immortality.
I absolutely adore the names that you come up with in your books. In fact, my first impression when reading your work was, THIS IS FANTASY.  It’s almost the same as test driving a car for the first time. As soon as you step into the vehicle; grab the steering wheel, start the engine and pull out onto the road that it’s the car for you. Hey, it’s fantasy on wheels!
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*What is the connection between Anaerfell & the Kaelandur Series?
Excellent question. Anaerfell takes place 80 years prior to the events in Melkorka, the first of the Kaelandur Series. The book, although a standalone, is written to be a prelude to the series, giving breadth to why the characters in the Kaelandur Series are facing the deadly threats of the Netherworld.
*What is Grimsdalr about?
Grimsdalr is a short story meant to highlight how hubris is regarded in modern society when compared to the norms of olden times. The story is a rewritten, 30-minute read masking the opening pages of Beowulf keeping much of the same tone and language of the original tale.
Grimsdalr is another excellent name by the way….Just read this and the ending was very striking and totally wasn’t what I was expecting. Stellar writing that reminded me of Beowulf. LOVE BEOWULF. That’s my boy!
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Grimsdalr

*Who are your favorite characters and what do you appreciate about them? 
I have answered this question often, and I think my answer continues to strike folks as strange. But my favorite character in my series is the antagonist, Falmagon. I appreciate his commitment to his beliefs and his intent to make the world a better place, regardless of whether others support his cause. Of course, I also have a special place in my heart for my cliche’d, all-knowing, often-drunk wizard, Dorofej. Many have called him the Gandalf of the Kaelandur Series.
I can totally relate to this. I love my antagonists and evil henchmen! BROUHAHAHA! In Transformers, Megatron was my favorite. In Star Wars, it was Darth Vader. In my WIP there’s several antagonists that are my FAVS. Here are a few:
Lord Gracious, twin brother of Brynn Talegan. 
Barag, Lord of the Dark Vein of Evil
Pronvis, General in the Dark Vein of Evil
Grand Morticus, High Priest of the Dark Vein of Evil
Grane, the Unmerciful Death Lord
*What are your top 3 favorite weapons?
I am a simple man. Give me a quarterstaff, a good set of throwing knives, and a longbow.
Simple enough. 
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*What top 5 books would you recommend?
The Crown of Stone Trilogy by C.L. Schneider
Dolor and Shadow by Angela B. Chrysler
Wolves of the Dawn by William Sarabande
The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien
Prince of Thorns by Mark Lawrence
Thanks for the references!
*What else do you have coming down the pike?
I am currently finishing up Blood and Bile with my co-writer, J.C. Boyd. This dark fantasy tale will be introducing his ancient world, beginning with giants walking with mammoths in the northern lands battling dark spirits.In addition, I should be finishing Maharia, the third and final installment of the Kaelandur Series, and ready for release by April 2017.
Thanks so much for having me for an interview! These questions were excellently crafted.
Awesome! Thanks for coming on the train.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.thewritingtrain.com