How to Write A 5 Day Novel with Scott King

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY FOLKS!

 

 

 

television-clker-purple-2

 

 

 

 

How to Write A 5 Day Novel with Scott King

 

 

 

 

What did you take away from this video? Tell me in the comments!!

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

BOOKS AND BLURBS: WHO A novel of the near future by Karen A. Wyle

 

 

Pages and glowing letters flying out of a book

 

 

 

 

BOOKS AND BLURBS

 

WHO A novel of the near future

by Karen A. Wyle

 

 

 

 

WHO

 

 

 

Goodreads

 

Have they changed their minds? Or have their minds been changed?

Death is no longer the end. Those who prepare, and can afford it, may have their memories and personalities digitally preserved. The digitally stored population can interact with the world of the living, remaining part of their loved ones’ lives. They can even vote.

But digital information has its vulnerabilities.

After the young and vital Thea dies and is stored, her devoted husband Max starts to wonder about changes in her preoccupations and politics. Are they simply the result of the new company she keeps? Or has she been altered without her knowledge and against her will?

And if Thea is no longer herself, what can they do?

 

 

 

 

virtual-reality-1802469_960_720

 

 

 

 

 

 

*How did the concept of this book develop?

I’ve been aware of the concept of digital survival after corporeal death since reading Frederick Pohl’s Heechee Saga, if not before. Following all the public discussion of hacking computer files, I eventually thought of the possibility that digital personalities and memories could be hacked.

This is definitely a scary thought! I’ve read some of Ray Kurzweil’s writings along this line. Cool, but scary. 

 

 

 

 

hacked

 

 

 

 

 

*Tell us about the main character, Thea. 

Thea is a tough and assertive young woman. She’s very creative but also analytical. In the latter respect, she takes after her mother, though the two of them disagree on politics. (Thea leans libertarian.) I wouldn’t call her a romantic, though she is deeply in love with her husband Max. She has a big appetite for experience and sensation.

She sounds like someone I’d like to meet! Thea is also a nice name 🙂

 

 

 

*What is the setting like in WHO?

There are two basic settings: the “real” or corporeal world, and the digital environment LiveAfter provides its clients. The latter lacks variety and interest, though this may be corrected eventually. I tried to create a contrast between the vivid sensory detail of our world and the digital alternative.

I believe settings matter a lot in stories to cement the reader and deepen the storyline. This one sounds marvelous!

 

 

 

 

*Tell us about the technology employed in your book. 

Clients are given a liquid filled with nanoparticles that travel throughout the nervous system. They are then put through very detailed scans that rely on the nanoparticles to map neural pathways and connections. That data is used to create virtual files of the client’s personality and memories. After the initial baseline data collection, clients can come in for subsequent scans to update their files.

It’s amazing what they’re able to do with nanoparticles. What will they come up next! 

 

 

 

 

 

Nerve cell

 

 

 

 

*Can you tell us something about WHO that we wouldn’t know by reading the book?

You wouldn’t know about a disgusting slob of a hacker who figured in the story until fairly late in the revision process.

You might not realize how much I didn’t already know, and had to learn, about federal court procedure in general and class actions in particular.

You might not know how much of the plot I made up as I went along. I’m what some writers call a “pantser,” meaning I fly by the seat of my pants – at the rough draft stage at least — rather than planning ahead in detail.

Learning is always a good thing, eh? That’s one thing I like about reading and being a writer—You get to learn all manner of things. 

 

 

 

*What did you learn from researching the technology?

One of my beta readers, who’s an expert on software and related technologies, educated me about what machine-generated code would look like and how it would differ from code a human would write. He also shared with me a few basics about subroutines.

Wow. I didn’t know machine generate codes at all. That’s amazing. 

 

 

 

 

code

 

 

 

 

*Do you think there’s a  futuristic possibility of digitizing memories and personalities?

Assuming no catastrophic descent into a pre-technological era, I’d call it (pun intended) a virtual certainty.

Yikes! Digitizing memories or personalities definitely hard to fathom at this point, but I wouldn’t be surprised when we get there!

 

 

 

 

memories

 

 

 

 

THANKS

 

 

 

Connect with Karen!

Goodreads | Website | Facebook |

Amazon

 

 

 

Thanks for riding the Train folks!! Don’t be a stranger!

 

 

 

Waving bye

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

Discussing Writing Tips with Janice Hardy & Lorna Faith

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY FOLKS!

 

 

 

 

television-148223_960_720

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Tips for Understanding Show, Don’t Tell with Janice Hardy

 

 

 

 

 

 

How do you ‘show’ in your writing? Tell me in the comments!!

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

Talking Audiobooks with Joanna Penn & J. Daniel Sawyer

SMILE IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

 

 

television-148830_960_720

 

 

 

 

 

Audiobook Production, Distribution & Sales with J.Daniel Sawyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you love audiobooks? Tell me in the comments!!

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

The Future of Publishing: AI, Mixed Reality, Machine Learning And More With Thad McIlroy

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY EVERYBODY!!

With Joanna Penn & Thad McIlroy

 

 

 

television-tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did you take away from this video? Tell me in the comments!!

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

Writing Award-Winning Thrillers, Co-Writing And Going Hybrid with Rebecca Cantrell

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY FOLKS

With Rebecca Cantrell & Joanna Penn

 

 

 

television-148223_960_720

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Award-Winning Thrillers, Co-Writing And Going Hybrid with Rebecca Cantrell

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you read Rebecca Cantrell’s books? Tell me in the comments!

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

mtw-email-logo

The Story of Writer Pam Lazos

 

pam-lazos

 

 

 

So who is Pam Lazos?

 

Let’s find out!

 

 

 

 

 

story matters

 

 

 

 

Pam Lazos is an environmental lawyer and the author of the eco thriller, “Oil and Water”, about oil spills and green technology, and of a collection of novellas, “Six Sisters”, about family, dysfunction and the ties that bind us; creator of the literary and eco blog http://www.greenlifebluewater.wordpress.com; a blogger for the Global Water Alliance (GWA) in Philadelphia; on the Board of Advisors for the wH2O Journal, the Journal of Gender and Water (University of Pennsylvania); a former correspondent for her local newspaper (Lancaster Intelligencer Journal); a literary magazine contributor (Rapportage); an editor and ghostwriter; the author of a children’s book (“Into the Land of the Loud”); and, because it’s cool, a beekeeper’s apprentice. She practices laughter daily.

 

Pam is also one of our wonderful authors in this year’s Mystery Thriller Week celebration beginning Feb. 12-22nd. Don’t miss out on all the fun!

 

 

 

 

oil-and-water

 

 

 

 

You’re a writer so what’s your story? Or what inspired you?

I think it’s less about inspiration for me and more about need.  I need to write. It’s either that or spend copious amounts of money on therapy!  I actually went to my first writing class because a friend dragged me along.  I went and never looked back. That was 20 years ago.  One of my first classes was a screenwriting class.  I think visually and it carries over into my writing so that class was a perfect fit for me.

The need to write is a great thing to have. Sometimes I sense an urge to write, but oftentimes not. But if I keep writing the need to write increases. Yay!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

writing-cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

What’s your GOAL in becoming a writer?

I think we’re all writers at heart. We all have stories we want to tell.  Some of us are better orators than writers, but we’re all storytellers.  Beyond that, though, I have this burning desire to educate people about the need to care for the environment and I often use my writing to get some of these environmental issues out there across a greater spectrum.  I do my best not to be preachy which is why I like thrillers because I can hide the information I’m hoping to convey inside the action.

It’s good that you have a specific passion to write about. That’s wonderful. A great topic too!

 

 

 

 

dart-board-md

 

 

 

 

What 3 things have hindered you from completing your projects? (CONFLICT)

Oh, a full time job, my volunteer work, and, of course, familial obligations.  I have to either stay up really late or get up really early to get anything done.  I’ve been trying to dedicate blocks of time on the weekends, but we have a busy household so it’s not easy.

I salute you for writing books with so many responsibilities! It can be done!





responsibility




What keeps you motivated in achieving your dream? (DESIRE)

That’s a good question and I don’t really know the answer.  I don’t think it’s simply the desire to be a rich and famous best-selling author.  I think it’s more visceral than that. Writing helps me sort out the messiness of my life. It’s almost as if I need to write to make sense of things.

YES. I LOVE THAT. I think deep down I feel the same way. Visceral. 





dream-1804598_960_720




What’s your ANTAGONIST? What’s in the way?

It used to be me.  I got in the way, either because of my inexperience, my lack of confidence, my lack of faith in myself and my ability.  But I’ve been working at this writing thing for almost 20 years now and I feel as though I’ve really hit the tipping point. I’ve put the hours in and I feel as though I could write anything anyone asks of me.

Wow. I love hearing your experience on this. It’s very inspiring for us newbies.





obstacle






Why do writer’s give up, quit, or never complete their work?

Hmmm, not sure.  You definitely need a tough exterior, have to listen to “no” about a thousand times, and yet still keep at it. Tenacity is key.  A lot of people want instant gratification, but unless you’re incredibly lucky, the business of writing is a long game.

That’s right! It’s definitely not a sprint but a marathon. 





marathon






What would you say to a struggling writer who has given up?

You’ve got to write for yourself first and if you’re not doing that, then it’s probably a good idea to give up.  If you’re already writing for yourself, it’s likely that you’re still in this thing and that you’ll be in it for the long haul.

Well put. 





yes-i-can





BONUS: What else do you have coming down the pike?

I’m currently working on a psychological thriller about the pharmaceutical industry and a vaccine gone bad.

OH! I love that. Please keep me in the loop for that one. A possible ARC? Would love to help.



Thanks Pam!!




Connect with Pam Lazos

Amazon | Goodreads | Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

earth-1013746_960_720

 

 

 

 

 

The earth does not belong to us, we belong to the earth.-Chief Seattle







Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

The Story of an Author on a Mission: Sarah Key

 

 

What is your story Concept

 

 

 

 

“Every life lived is a story worth telling”-Benjamin Thomas

 

 

 

 

 

sarah-key-2

 

 

 

Life is a story, what does yours say? -Unknown

 

 

 

 

Today we have with us an excellent writer from South Africa, Sarah Key. She’s the author of Tangled Weeds and the Sister of Light series; The Dandelion Clock and The Butterfly Wind. Sarah is also one of our authors participating in this year’s Mystery Thriller Week event. Please check out the site for more details. It begins Feb.12-22nd, don’t miss it!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

You’re a writer; so what’s your story, or what inspired you?

Becoming a writer was a natural progression of my professional life. I have a liberal arts degree majoring in English and Psychology before training as a high school English and Guidance teacher. After that I moved into Adult Education in which I hold a Master’s Degree.

I worked at the University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg, South Africa) teaching academic writing before embarking on a project in the arena of HIV and AIDS, a devastating pandemic affecting many people in Southern Africa.

After a three year period of travelling the country, the UICEF and Department of Social Development initiative ran its course and I was at a crossroads. I was processing experiences of working in semi-rural environments with people who had very different social practices and cultures. I decided these, with a bit of flair and a stretch of the imagination, would make good stories.

I really appreciate your kindness in helping others. Education at necessary at every stage in life. Very unique. 

 

 

 

 

 

kindness-1197351_960_720

 

 

 

 

 

What’s your GOAL in becoming a writer?

I began to write to make sense of aspects of life that affected or concerned me. I had been a social activist and was worried about many issues such as the instability of southern Africa and how this feeds into the exploitation of women and children (sex trafficking). I had witnessed the downward spiral that accompanies drug addiction, and I wanted to write novels that exposed the harsh realities of life to sensitise people towards these conditions and to increase tolerance and understanding. Wrapping them in the guise of fiction in a gripping psychological thriller was one way I thought would make them more palatable.

Writing, for me, is therapeutic and is a way I can release my creativity. It is something my soul demands I do. It gives me tremendous pleasure and, at times, a fair bit of pain too!

Wow. That’s a great way to release your creativity, Sarah. These are harsh realities the world has to deal with, but ‘m glad your muse has found an outlet to tackle them! I have tons of books to read but I’d like to make room for yours as well. 

 

 

 

 

 

goal-setting-1955809_960_720

 

 

 

 

 

 

What 3 things have hindered you from completing your projects? (CONFLICT)

I have completed all of my projects so far. My debut novel, Tangled Weeds is a stand-alone book and currently I have almost finished The Starlight Tide, the final book in my Sisters of Light trilogy, This follows The Dandelion Clock and The Butterfly Wind.

I have been writing since 2011 and, although I could have written faster, I have not put myself under creative pressure. Life gets in the way of art at times and I have been involved in raising our two daughters and have family responsibilities. At stages I have had a mini crisis of faith but I am doggedly determined and once a book is begun am driven to complete it.

Life does certainly get in the way at times. Much too often in my opinion, but I admire your determination! Once we start something it must be finished. That’s the way it ought to be.

 

 

 

 

 

Conflict builds character. Crisis Defines it.-Steven V. Thulon

 

 

 

 

 

What keeps you motivated in achieving your dream? (DESIRE)

Writing is my life’s purpose at the moment and that passion goes a long way to keeping me motivated. There is nothing better than seeing your book published with your name on the cover.

I have a highly active imagination and a plethora of ideas. Once a setting and a cast of characters invade my mind I am under siege! My characters develop through my stories; they evolve or devolve as the case may be. The moral dilemmas they face are of particular interest to me. I believe that good must triumph over evil and there is always a chance of redemption. I think that this message of hope must be offered to readers in these challenging times.

YES,  I love it! Purpose and passion are two big motivators for anyone. I love the imagination of authors! It keeps me turning the pages coming back for more. Can’t wait to read your books. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fuel

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s your ANTAGONIST? What’s in the way?

One can always find excuses that delay or sabotage dreams.

This game can be overwhelming and doubt destructive. I am fortunate that I have a husband who supports me and my work, which is a huge factor. I have also learnt that it is more important to live modestly and do what makes you truly happy.

Your statements rings so true. Excuses, doubt, and lack of support all are formidable opponents. 

 

 

 

 

 

conquer-fear-everyday

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why do writers give up, quit or never complete their projects?

There are so many answers to that question. Writers often feel lonely and have no support. They cannot pay the rent by writing. Insecurity about the quality of their work shuts down their imagination and they run out of ideas and cannot finish their stories. They read other people’s books and feel inferior and are rejected too many times by publishers and/or their confidence is eroded by unfavourable reviews. They are overwhelmed by the fact that writing is the easy part of the job and the rest is too great a mountain to even attempt to summit.

This is a great list. An accurate one too! This is one of my favorite responses to this question. 

 

 

 

 

 

never-be-afraid-to-fly

 

 

 

 

 

What would you say to a struggling writer who’s given up?

Write for yourself. Write for personal satisfaction and mental gymnastics for your brain. Appreciate that writing is not easy. Some days you strike the keyboard with smug satisfaction and other days you sit tormented and tearful. Try to get into a routine of writing every day – even if it’s just for twenty minutes, The more you practice the better you’ll get.

Like everything in life, you have to deeply desire the final product and realise that it takes a lot of effort, sweat and tears. Finish what you start. It gives you a great sense of accomplishment. Writing teaches you discipline and courage and these attributes will stand you in great stead throughout your life.

Find a writing group or a mentor. Use social media to link to like-minded readers and writers – there are a gazillion out there. Writers are kind; they form communities and nurture and support each other.

Excellent! Medicine for the weary!

 

 

 

 

 

 

do-not-give-up

 

 

 

 

 

 

What else do you have coming down the pike?

Once I have completed my trilogy, I plan to write a novel highlighting the plight of rural girls in South Africa.

From the coastal city of Durban, to rural hills outside Ixopo, to smoky Alexandra Township and the posh suburbs of Johannesburg, Veils of Smoke will follow Nonhlanhla Biyela on a dangerous undertaking to try to locate her missing cousin, Sinazo.

Wonderful. Keep us posted on the third installment and the next novel. Would love to see how it pans out. 

 

 

 

 

Thanks so much Sarah! You’re words have not been wasted. You’ll be a truly effective writer. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

wings-bird-overcome

 

 

 

 

 

“Never be afraid to fly”

 

 

 

 

“Don’t climb the mountain others have built. It’s better to grow wings.”-Benjamin Thomas

 

 

 

 

 

mtw-email-logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

Forensic Lenses Series with Author Sherrie W. Frontz

 

lens-1

 

 

Welcome back to the Forensic Lenses Series!

An investigative and exploratory approach into the minds of voracious readers everywhere.

 

sw-frontz

Today we have an author of Romance, suspense and mystery novels, Sherrie W. Frontz. She’s the author of When the Morning Comes, and Don’t Look Back from the Land’s End series.  Sherrie is also one our many talented authors in this year’s Mystery Thriller Week event, beginning Feb.12-22nd! Don’t miss it!!

 

 

when-the-morning-comes

 

Goodreads

 

 

 

 

dont-look-back

 

Goodreads

 

 

 

 

 

 

What were your first memories of reading as a child?

My first memories of reading were my mom reading to me as a toddler.  She worked with me and I was reading by the age of four. I read Gone with the Wind when I was twelve.

Thank God for Moms! 

 

 

 

 

 

moms

 

 

 

 

What were your favorite sleuths as a youth?

My favorite sleuth as a child was Trixie Belden.  I had all the books in the series that were available in the 70’s.

Good ol’ Trixie Belden. I hear her name quite a bit. 

 

 

 

 

 

trixie-belden-1

 

 

 

 

What else do you enjoy in a story besides solving the crime?

Besides figuring out the “who did it” part of a story, I enjoy the interacting of the main characters.

YES. I love this too. The dynamics amongst characters brings out more depth, dialogue and conflict!

 

 

 

 

 

 

dialogue

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name your favorite classical and modern sleuths.

I have no classical favorite sleuths; as far as modern sleuths, Lucas Davenport from John Sanford’s prey series.

Eh, I don’t have a favorite classical sleuth either. I’ll have to check out this Lucas Davenport character and see what he’s about. 

 

 

 

How do they solve crimes and what makes them different from one another?

Both classical and modern solve cases by talking to witnesses and listening to their hunches.  Modern sleuths have the advantages of modern technology, dna bases, fbi profiles, gps tracking, cell phone records, etc.

I love seeing how things have progressed over the years. Of course, the main staples don’t change!

 

 

 

 

 

dna

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name some recent suspense books you’ve read. 

I recently read Triple Six by Erica Spindler and I re-read all of Tess Gerritson’s Rizzoli and Isle series of books over the past couple of months.

Thanks for the recommendations! Gotta love em’.

 

 

 

 

 

read-with-heart

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who are some of the best suspense writers?

Some of my favorite suspense authors are Erica Spindler, John Sanford, Lee Child, Tami Hoag

Lovely.  I’ve never heard of Spindler or Tami Hoag, but that’s never stopped me from finding great authors!

 

 

 

 

 

“The world belongs to those who read.”-Rick Holland

 

 

 

 

 

If you could pick a character as the director of the FBI, who would it be?

I think the best choice for director of the FBI would be Benton Wesley, Dr. Kay Scarpetta’s husband, written by Patricia Cornwell.

Awesome! Great choice. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fbi-seal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you could marry a fictional character who would it be? 

If I could marry a fictional character it would be Lucas Davenport from the prey series.

Hmm. This Davenport character must’ve really scored some points. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

couple-260899_960_720

 

 

 

 

 

At the scene of the crime…

 

Name 3-5 pet peeves as a reader.

If the print isn’t right I won’t read it. I hate when a story drags too.

I can’t stand dragging stories either. Since I normally finish every book, I end up dragging right along with them. *Sigh*

 

 

 

 

 

at-the-scene-of-the-crime-1

 

 

 

 

 

Connect with Sherrie W. Frontz!

 

Amazon | Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for stopping by!!

 

 

 

 

“To a great mind, nothing is little.”-Sherlock Holmes.

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

mtw-email-logo

 

 

Use Your Own Life Story to Bring Depth To Your Writing

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

WITH JOANNA PENN  & STEVEN PRESSFIELD

 

 

 

 

 

television-clker-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did you learn? Tell me in the comments!!

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com