The First Act with Author Emily Elaine

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The First Act of Writing with Emily Elaine

 

How do you introduce your story?

 

I always begin my books with a catastrophic event in the prologue that directly affects both the protagonist’s internal conflict and the entire plot. For Example, in my upcoming novel: The Born Weapons, my protagonist is the first “natural-born” of his kind and his birth is an act of Rebellion against “the Maker.” The Maker makes a deal with my protagonist’s mother that if she kills the Rebel Leader, who is her honorary brother, than her baby can live.

 

What’s your process of creating characters?

 

I base my characters off a theme such as truth or innocence. There after, I build their backstory, psychology, personality, appearance, and quirks. The themes I choose correspond to the plot work. For example, my protagonist is based on truth and the catalyst to the climax is the event in which he tells humanity the truth about why his kind was created.  

 

 

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How do you introduce the main conflict?

 

I design the main conflict and my protagonist’s identity to be symbiotic. In my current novel, the main conflict is that the ‘Alma’ (a type of cyborg) are subject to the oppression of their Makers and Humanity. Since my protagonist is an Alma, he and the conflict are introduced simultaneously.

 

How do you approach writing the first Act, or 25% of the book?

 

I love to hit the ground running. I believe that characterization and world building are best shown and not told, so I throw my MC into peril from the first chapter and introduce settings, characters, etc… in pace with the plot.  

 

 

 

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Do you use a certain number of scenes per Act?

 

Nope! I actually don’t pay attention to anything regarding quantity such as pages, scenes, or acts until I am revising. I only concern myself with following my outline to ensure I cover all my plot points, sub plot points, character development milestones, ect….

 

What’s the hardest part of developing the setup?

 

I assume that by ‘setup’ you mean world building and primary conflict. I often struggle to include world building details while drafting because I tend to focus on plot and character development. I’ve learned to let these details go and add them in while revising.

 

What has helped you develop your writing skills?

I have to say that the process of trial and error has been most helpful. I’ve been writing books since I was eight years old. Also, reading has helped improve my writing voice over the years.  

 

 

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A Word with Kate Rhodes on Writing

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A Word with Kate Rhodes on Writing

 

 

What’s your creative approach to writing?

I treat it like a job, these days. It may sound unromantic, but writing one or two novels a year takes discipline. I tend to research, write and edit for eight hours, every week day.

 

 

Outlining or pantsing?  

I like to outline, but always veer away from my plan! I wish I could stick to my blueprint, but I get distracted by better ideas, or juicier characters, so my plans are constantly changing.

 

 

 

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When you write crime fiction what comes first? The crime, character, idea?

First the location, then the theme. I fell in love with the Isles of Scilly as a child, for their wild remoteness and knew I had to set a series there.

 

How do you get to know your characters?

I write detailed profiles, so I know all of their quirks.

 

 

 

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What’s the hardest part of writing for you?

Lack of confidence. It doesn’t matter how many books I write, I always reach a point, midway through the writing when my belief takes a nosedive. It takes one heck of a lot of stamina and a robust ego to stay in the writing game.

 

 

How has your writing process changed over the years and books written?

I began life as a poet, writing longhand, but now use my computer for pretty much everything. With poetry you have to agonise over every word because the form is so precise, but prose is much more discursive.

 

 

 

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Did you write poetry before novels?

I surely did. Two collections, Reversal and The Alice Trap, both published by wonderful London press, Enitharmon.

 

 

What do you enjoy most about poetry?

Its impact. If a poem is doing its job well, it can be like a bullet of truth, straight to the heart.

 

 

 

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Can you share one of your poems?

Not right now, I’m afraid, I’m deep in the middle of a crime novel, but my poems are floating around on the net if you go looking for them.

 

 

What next for you?

Two more books in my Hell Bay series, published by Simon and Schuster, which I’m enjoying enormously.

 

 

Hell Bay

Ruin Beach

Burnt Island

 

 

 

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KATE RHODES is a full-time crime writer, living in Cambridge with her husband, a writer and film maker. Kate used to be an English teacher and has published two award winning collections of poetry. In 2015 she won the Ruth Rendell short story prize. Kate is the author of the acclaimed ALICE QUENTIN series, with the fifth book, BLOOD SYMMETRY published in 2016.

In January 2018 Kate will publish the first novel in a new series, HELL BAY, a crime novel set on the remote Cornish island of Bryher, featuring DI Ben Kitto.
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KateRhodeswriter.com

 

 

 

 

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7 Billion Readers and How to Reach Them: The Self Publishing Show episode 156

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY!!

 

 

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7 Billion Readers and How to Reach Them (The Self Publishing Show, episode 156)

 

 

 

 

From the Self Publishing Formula

Options for authors are increasing all the time. James talks to Kinga Jentetics about PublishDrive, an aggregator that can distribute books globally, including growing English markets like China and India.

 

Highlights on this episode:

  • On the idea for building a global platform to distribute books
  • How PublishDrive supports authors with tools and information about book sales
  • How PublishDrive works with the online retailers to promote authors
  • On the two types of authors who use PublishDrive
  • International book distribution including China and India

 

 

 

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How to Write a Book: 13 Steps From Jerry Jenkins a Bestselling Author

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY FOLKS!

 

 

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How to Write a Book: 13 Steps From a Bestselling Author

 

 

 

Get the free guide: How to Write a Book: Everything You Nee to Know

 

 

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Jerry Bruce Jenkins is an American novelist and biographer. He is best known as co-author of the Left Behind series of books with Tim LaHaye. Jenkins has written over 185 books, including mysteries, historical fiction, biblical fiction, cop thrillers, international spy thrillers, and children’s adventures, as well as non-fiction. His works usually feature Christians as protagonists. In 2005, Jenkins and LaHaye ranked 9th in Amazon.com’s10th Anniversary list of Hall of Fame authors based on books sold at Amazon.com during its first 10 years. Jenkins now teaches writers to become authors here at his website. He and his wife Dianna have three sons and eight grandchildren.

 

 

 

The Million Dollar Indie Author with Shayne Silvers

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY FOLKS

 

 

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The Million Dollar Indie author with Shayne Silvers

 

 

 

 

 

There you have it folks.

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

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Masterclass: Amazon Ads What’s Working Right Now with Mark Dawson

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Masterclass: Amazon Ads What’s Working Right Now with Mark Dawson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

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Book Cover Design Tips With Stuart Bache & Joanna Penn

ITS TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

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Book Cover Design Tips With Stuart Bache and Joanna Penn

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Story Structure First Act by Usvaldo De Leon

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Story Structure First Act

by Usvaldo De Leon

 

Structuring a story is a challenge that writers meet in one of two ways: either they outline diligently before they write so much as a sentence, OR: they fire up the word maker and see what happens. The former are called plotters. The latter people are called pantsers and I am one of them.

The difference between the groups lies in how comfortable a writer is with chaos. To write is to literally visit a foreign land. Plotters like to have an itinerary. They know where they will be in the morning, where they are eating lunch, etc. Pantsers wake up and walk out the door with nary a thought for the day. Plotters attempt to impose control. Pantsers attempt to maximize experience.

I view writing as a discovery process. It lets me explore the characters, their interactions, the plot and setting. It lets me feel the story. I’m frequently surprised by what occurs, which leads me to more character driven, organic stories. For plotters, the outline process performs the same function.  The end result for both groups is a story that is thematically and narratively coherent.

For me a story begins with either a situation or an image. If I see an image then it is usually the climax. Seven men on a sailboat in the Pacific. One of them is trying to sabotage the boat, everyone knows it and everyone is on edge. If I have a situation, it is usually the inciting incident. A dying billionaire wants to read his obituary so he fakes his death.

Why my brain works like this is not something I think about. I believe it is churlish to be picky about how one receives inspiration. One does not find a ten dollar bill on the sidewalk and get upset it was not a twenty. Inspiration is a gift.

Next I figure out the bones of the story, a.k.a. structure. Authors use story structure because it is how people’s brains and hearts respond to narrative.

In the first act, the character sees a flaw in the normal world and ventures into the unknown to fix it. In the second act, the character faces myriad challenges to create a solution to the problem. In the third act, the character braces for a final showdown to win the prize and restore the normal world. This template covers everything from Star Wars to Liar Liar and all points in between.

 

 

Resources:

How to Take the Guesswork Out of What Scenes Belong in Your First Act

The First Act Turning Point

The First Act: Nailing Your Novel’s Opening Chapters

 

 

 

Write Sign, Love for Writing, for writers and authors.

 

 

 

 

 

Building Readership with Youtube with Garrett Robinson & Antoine Bandele

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

 

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Building Readership with Youtube with Garrett Robinson & Antoine Bandele

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

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#Bookstagrammars: How to reach Readers through Instagram

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

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#Bookstagrammars How to reach Readers through Instagram

 

 

 

 

Do you use Instagram? Why or why not?

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com