The Million Dollar Indie Author with Shayne Silvers

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY FOLKS

 

 

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The Million Dollar Indie author with Shayne Silvers

 

 

 

 

 

There you have it folks.

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

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Masterclass: Amazon Ads What’s Working Right Now with Mark Dawson

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Masterclass: Amazon Ads What’s Working Right Now with Mark Dawson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

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Book Cover Design Tips With Stuart Bache & Joanna Penn

ITS TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

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Book Cover Design Tips With Stuart Bache and Joanna Penn

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Story Structure First Act by Usvaldo De Leon

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Story Structure First Act

by Usvaldo De Leon

 

Structuring a story is a challenge that writers meet in one of two ways: either they outline diligently before they write so much as a sentence, OR: they fire up the word maker and see what happens. The former are called plotters. The latter people are called pantsers and I am one of them.

The difference between the groups lies in how comfortable a writer is with chaos. To write is to literally visit a foreign land. Plotters like to have an itinerary. They know where they will be in the morning, where they are eating lunch, etc. Pantsers wake up and walk out the door with nary a thought for the day. Plotters attempt to impose control. Pantsers attempt to maximize experience.

I view writing as a discovery process. It lets me explore the characters, their interactions, the plot and setting. It lets me feel the story. I’m frequently surprised by what occurs, which leads me to more character driven, organic stories. For plotters, the outline process performs the same function.  The end result for both groups is a story that is thematically and narratively coherent.

For me a story begins with either a situation or an image. If I see an image then it is usually the climax. Seven men on a sailboat in the Pacific. One of them is trying to sabotage the boat, everyone knows it and everyone is on edge. If I have a situation, it is usually the inciting incident. A dying billionaire wants to read his obituary so he fakes his death.

Why my brain works like this is not something I think about. I believe it is churlish to be picky about how one receives inspiration. One does not find a ten dollar bill on the sidewalk and get upset it was not a twenty. Inspiration is a gift.

Next I figure out the bones of the story, a.k.a. structure. Authors use story structure because it is how people’s brains and hearts respond to narrative.

In the first act, the character sees a flaw in the normal world and ventures into the unknown to fix it. In the second act, the character faces myriad challenges to create a solution to the problem. In the third act, the character braces for a final showdown to win the prize and restore the normal world. This template covers everything from Star Wars to Liar Liar and all points in between.

 

 

Resources:

How to Take the Guesswork Out of What Scenes Belong in Your First Act

The First Act Turning Point

The First Act: Nailing Your Novel’s Opening Chapters

 

 

 

Write Sign, Love for Writing, for writers and authors.

 

 

 

 

 

Building Readership with Youtube with Garrett Robinson & Antoine Bandele

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

 

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Building Readership with Youtube with Garrett Robinson & Antoine Bandele

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

Retro steam train.

 

 

 

 

 

 

#Bookstagrammars: How to reach Readers through Instagram

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

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#Bookstagrammars How to reach Readers through Instagram

 

 

 

 

Do you use Instagram? Why or why not?

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tips For Long-Term Author Success With Sherrilyn Kenyon & Joanna Penn

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

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80 Million Books Sold. Tips For Long-Term Author Success With Sherrilyn Kenyon

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Tips: How To Be A Prolific Writer With Bec Evans From Prolifiko

It’s Television Tuesday!

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Writing Tips: How To Be A Prolific Writer With Bec Evans From Prolifiko

 

 

 

 

Get back to writing!

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

Author Mindset: Choose Wonder Over Worry With Amber Rae & Joanna Penn

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

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Author Mindset: Choose Wonder Over Worry With Amber Rae

 

 

 

Amberrae.com

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

HOW TO WAKE YOUR MUSE AFTER A “Rip Van Winkle” LIKE SLUMBER

Inspiration

 

 

HOW TO WAKE YOUR MUSE AFTER A “Rip Van Winkle” LIKE SLUMBER

 

After being bit by the “I’m going to write a book” bug, I blazed through five months and 113,000 words to create two separate stories. All the time I spent was filled with excitement and enthusiasm, feeling my ‘muse’ on my shoulder cheering me to the finish line.

As it turned out, I realized I was in a race on a very long course, not a drag strip. Completing the first 2 eBooks was just the beginning. As I wrote those stories, each chapter I completed filled my head with new ideas and plot twists for the follow-on story.

   After completing the second story to my second trilogy (that’s another by itself) I took the leap and decided to go the self-publish, print-on-demand route by placing my completed work on CreateSpace for all to hold if they so choose.

Unfortunately, while my artist and I struggled with a formatting issue on one of the covers, my ‘muse’ decided to take a nap as it were, without permission. I still had pages of notes and plotlines to work through on my fifth WIP, but my desire and motivation had left on the heels of my ‘muse’.

One thing I do to escape is to listen to music, and this is what I turned to in an attempt to coax my ‘muse’ to return. Thankfully I have an abundance of instrumental music to dive into, and so for several days, actually weeks, I would sit and listen, staring at the proverbial blank page of MS Word in the hopes something would jump out and stick.

My other trick I used in the past, and once again in this case, was rereading my previous work. After writing 3 individuals ‘chapters’, I create a new file allowing me to consolidate what I’ve completed. After this is done, I continue to add my completed pieces until I exceed my word count or page count, whichever comes first.

I’m happy to say, this works for me, but for others, I’m sure they have their own methods, tricks and secrets. In the end, it all comes down to one think, Keep Writing!

 

By Anthony Harrison

 

 

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