7 Billion Readers and How to Reach Them: The Self Publishing Show episode 156

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY!!

 

 

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7 Billion Readers and How to Reach Them (The Self Publishing Show, episode 156)

 

 

 

 

From the Self Publishing Formula

Options for authors are increasing all the time. James talks to Kinga Jentetics about PublishDrive, an aggregator that can distribute books globally, including growing English markets like China and India.

 

Highlights on this episode:

  • On the idea for building a global platform to distribute books
  • How PublishDrive supports authors with tools and information about book sales
  • How PublishDrive works with the online retailers to promote authors
  • On the two types of authors who use PublishDrive
  • International book distribution including China and India

 

 

 

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How to Write a Book: 13 Steps From Jerry Jenkins a Bestselling Author

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY FOLKS!

 

 

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How to Write a Book: 13 Steps From a Bestselling Author

 

 

 

Get the free guide: How to Write a Book: Everything You Nee to Know

 

 

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Jerry Bruce Jenkins is an American novelist and biographer. He is best known as co-author of the Left Behind series of books with Tim LaHaye. Jenkins has written over 185 books, including mysteries, historical fiction, biblical fiction, cop thrillers, international spy thrillers, and children’s adventures, as well as non-fiction. His works usually feature Christians as protagonists. In 2005, Jenkins and LaHaye ranked 9th in Amazon.com’s10th Anniversary list of Hall of Fame authors based on books sold at Amazon.com during its first 10 years. Jenkins now teaches writers to become authors here at his website. He and his wife Dianna have three sons and eight grandchildren.

 

 

 

The Million Dollar Indie Author with Shayne Silvers

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY FOLKS

 

 

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The Million Dollar Indie author with Shayne Silvers

 

 

 

 

 

There you have it folks.

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

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Masterclass: Amazon Ads What’s Working Right Now with Mark Dawson

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Masterclass: Amazon Ads What’s Working Right Now with Mark Dawson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

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Book Cover Design Tips With Stuart Bache & Joanna Penn

ITS TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

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Book Cover Design Tips With Stuart Bache and Joanna Penn

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Story Structure First Act by Usvaldo De Leon

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Story Structure First Act

by Usvaldo De Leon

 

Structuring a story is a challenge that writers meet in one of two ways: either they outline diligently before they write so much as a sentence, OR: they fire up the word maker and see what happens. The former are called plotters. The latter people are called pantsers and I am one of them.

The difference between the groups lies in how comfortable a writer is with chaos. To write is to literally visit a foreign land. Plotters like to have an itinerary. They know where they will be in the morning, where they are eating lunch, etc. Pantsers wake up and walk out the door with nary a thought for the day. Plotters attempt to impose control. Pantsers attempt to maximize experience.

I view writing as a discovery process. It lets me explore the characters, their interactions, the plot and setting. It lets me feel the story. I’m frequently surprised by what occurs, which leads me to more character driven, organic stories. For plotters, the outline process performs the same function.  The end result for both groups is a story that is thematically and narratively coherent.

For me a story begins with either a situation or an image. If I see an image then it is usually the climax. Seven men on a sailboat in the Pacific. One of them is trying to sabotage the boat, everyone knows it and everyone is on edge. If I have a situation, it is usually the inciting incident. A dying billionaire wants to read his obituary so he fakes his death.

Why my brain works like this is not something I think about. I believe it is churlish to be picky about how one receives inspiration. One does not find a ten dollar bill on the sidewalk and get upset it was not a twenty. Inspiration is a gift.

Next I figure out the bones of the story, a.k.a. structure. Authors use story structure because it is how people’s brains and hearts respond to narrative.

In the first act, the character sees a flaw in the normal world and ventures into the unknown to fix it. In the second act, the character faces myriad challenges to create a solution to the problem. In the third act, the character braces for a final showdown to win the prize and restore the normal world. This template covers everything from Star Wars to Liar Liar and all points in between.

 

 

Resources:

How to Take the Guesswork Out of What Scenes Belong in Your First Act

The First Act Turning Point

The First Act: Nailing Your Novel’s Opening Chapters

 

 

 

Write Sign, Love for Writing, for writers and authors.

 

 

 

 

 

Building Readership with Youtube with Garrett Robinson & Antoine Bandele

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

 

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Building Readership with Youtube with Garrett Robinson & Antoine Bandele

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

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#Bookstagrammars: How to reach Readers through Instagram

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

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#Bookstagrammars How to reach Readers through Instagram

 

 

 

 

Do you use Instagram? Why or why not?

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tips For Long-Term Author Success With Sherrilyn Kenyon & Joanna Penn

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

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80 Million Books Sold. Tips For Long-Term Author Success With Sherrilyn Kenyon

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Tips: How To Be A Prolific Writer With Bec Evans From Prolifiko

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Writing Tips: How To Be A Prolific Writer With Bec Evans From Prolifiko

 

 

 

 

Get back to writing!

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com