Writer Tony Harrison Discusses his Work in Progress

3d under construction

 

 

 

What is your approach to writing? Outline, spontaneous, or both?

I’m a little of both. I’ll jot down random thoughts at first, then piece them together in the order I think works best. Most are just one-liners, that become the basis for full-blown scenes or character POV’s.

 

Where does your story take place?

I actually have two ebooks out, with first one taking place in Aberdeen Scotland, along with snippets in Glasgow Scotland, Belfast Northern Ireland and Dublin Ireland. The other takes place in Marseille France, with snippets in Algiers, Algeria and Morocco.

 

Name your biggest struggles writing this book.

Maintaining consistency in time. Sometimes it is between morning, noon and night, while others is something happening on one day and jumping two days later.

 

What has been helpful to you?

Community and friends, both locally and via the web. HAving someone help me understand the subtle nuances in dialogue, setting and the treaded ‘showing v. telling’ is really helpful.

 

What have you learned in your writing journey thus far?

Each day brings a new challange; whether it is creating better dialogue, making my character’s more ‘believable’ or simply stringing the sentences together, it’s all a learning process.

 

Does your book feature a central protagonist?


Yes, Scotland Yard Chief Inspector Conor McDermott is the main character in the story. A former Royal Navy officer, he is assigned a case that began in Portsmouth when a dock worker who was killed is found.

 

How do you get to know your characters?

Having Conor as a police officer aligns with my grandfather’s brother who was a constable in Edinburgh. I also have two older cousin’s who are members of law enforcement, so Conor is a tribute to them in a small way.

 

What’s the overarching goal of the hero?

Conor is out to find out how his niece was drugged, which led to her death (she jumped from an apartment rooftop). He also looks to redeem himself as his tendency is to bend certain rules in pursuit of catching criminals.

 

 

A Goal Without a Plan Is Just a Wish sign on desert road

 

 

 

Thanks Tony!

 

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Author Interview with YA Fantasy writer Jenna Morland

Revived Jenna Morland

 

 

 

“A fast-paced, mystical adventure mixed with heartbreak and hope that will keep you turning the page well into the night.”

Brenda Drake, New York Times bestselling author

 

 

 

Swayzi is dying, there isn’t a specialist anywhere who can tell her why. Deemed a “medical anomaly” and given only two months to live, she is destined to live out the rest of her short life in the small town of Rowan, Alaska. That all changes when Swayzi bumps into Daylan, a handsome stranger only she can see. Around this new mysterious arrival, Swayzi feels healthier than she has in years, an improvement not lost on Tyler, her best friend and the boy next door. With Tyler and Daylan both vying for her heart, Swayzi struggles between what is familiar and the magnificent unknown world Daylan represents. But what Swayzi doesn’t know is that with her growing strength comes a new destiny, one that could force her to leave those she loves behind.

 

 

 

 

Interview image Jenna Morland

 

 

 

 

 

*Who were your main influences in the genre?
Influences… definitely JK Rowling. She’s a huge reason why my imagination thrived at a young age. Stephanie Meyer for sure, she showed me that there is a place for romance in fantasy. John Green, he’s given me many tears and I love that. When a book can affect you to the point of crying—like your life will never be the same again. That’s what I strive for.
*What made you want to be a writer?
I never considered myself a writer. As a kid, I never had a diary, and I dreaded English class. Not once did I dream I would one day write a book. Until I did. It was winter. The nights were long, and I was fighting a hint of postpartum depression. Really, all I wanted to do was cry… a lot. Instead, every night, once the kids were in bed, I wrote. As women, we are taught to always give, and never told to take time for ourselves. So, I stopped thinking what kind of mother I should be and started thinking of what kind of person I wanted to be. By taking the time and letting my creativity loose, I not only healed myself, I discovered a part of myself I never even knew I was missing. When the time came to make a decision on pursuing publication, I doubted my ability. I never studied writing. How could I be a writer? “By writing,” the answer came. And in the end that’s how simple it was. In writing Revived, I didn’t work from any preconceived notions of what novel should be. I simply wrote a book I wanted to read.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Write Jenna Morland

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Is Revived your first book?

Yes, Revived is my first novel.
*Why do you write YA Fantasy?
I love YA. There’s a certain innocence to it that attracts me. Falling in love for the first time, discovering who you are, the start of the rest. I enjoy writing fantasy because I love the freedom. There are no rules. No one can say, “that’s not right”, or, “it’s supposed to be like this”.

 

 

*How do feel about writing your first book?

I feel… satisfied. In the beginning this book was just something to keep me busy. It turned into so much more than that. I fell in love with writing and creating this world and these amazing characters. Now, I can’t imagine my life without it. It was 2 years ago this month that I began writing Revived. There has been a lot of sacrifice, rejection, and hard work to get to this point but I wouldn’t change a thing. I just finished my second round of editing which means I’m so close to seeing it in print and no other word describes how I feel better than satisfied.

 

 

 

 

 

*How do you personally benefit from writing?

Writing is a distraction, an outlet to channel my imagination and creativity. Writing has seen me at my worst, and at my best. There’s no judgement or expectation and I thrive when I’m in that safe place. Some days I question my sanity, I created these characters from scratch and now I speak about them as if they’re real. Nothing like a little crazy to keep things interesting! But mostly, I write because I love it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joy Jenna Morland

 

 

 

 

 

*Have you ever cried while writing?

Yes I have. I’m a very emotional person so there are many different reasons I’ve cried while writing. A song from my writing playlist that fits perfectly with a scene can make me tear up. Out of frustration—this happens more than I like to admit. I’m so attached to these characters that killing one of them is absolutely gut wrenching and cry-worthy for sure.

 

 

 

 

teardrop Jenna Morland

 

 

 

 

*What is the Imagination to you?

The imagination to me is the ability to step outside of yourself, to challenge the rules society has demanded we follow and embrace our creative side. The imagination allows us to be free. It gives us the ability to dream.

 

 

 

The imagination allows us to be free. It gives us the ability to dream. –Jenna Morland

 

 

 

 

*Tell us about who Swayzi is.

Swayzi is someone you’ll root for, she’s relatable, loveable, and so unaware of how amazing she is. When you first meet her, she’s in an impossible situation. She has been given 2 months to live and a huge part of her wants to give up. You start with her at her absolute lowest and follow her on a journey of discovering her self-worth. She finds love, experiences betrayal and heartbreak, but the most important and defining part of the book, well—you’ll have to read it to find out!

 

 

 

*What does she want the most?

Swayzi loves her family more than anything and would do anything to protect them. I would say their safety is her first priority. Beyond that, what she wants most is to shed all the insecurities, and doubt, and embrace her fate on her terms.

 

 

 

courage Jenna Morland

 

 

 

 

*Who are Daylan and Tyler?

Tyler is and always will be my favourite character to write. He is without a doubt the heart of this story. A quote from the book describes him best: “Tyler was glaringly human. He would hold my hand during the scary parts of a horror movie, not for me, but for him. He felt pain, I could see it written all over his face when I was sick. He was constantly digging himself a hole, never saying the right thing at the right time. He was simply imperfect, flawed even, but that’s what made him—him.”

Daylan is quite the opposite of Tyler. He is eloquent and knows exactly who he is and what he wants. He is the epitome of tall, dark and handsome and of course, very mysterious. Daylan has answers to questions Swayzi didn’t even know she had. Tyler may be the heart of this story, but Daylan drives it.

 

 

 

*When is the publication date for Revived?

Publication date is not official yet but it will be August or September. There’s a ton happening behind the scenes right now, cover design, release date, and some exciting extras that will be announced very soon. Keep an eye on my social media!

 

 

 

 

Thanks Jenna!!

 

 

 

Jenna Morland image works

 

 

 

 

Jenna Morland is the author of Revived published by Oftomes Publishing, set to release in 2018. Jenna is a Canadian born author, song writer, and mother of two that lives under the Northern Lights. Slytherin to the core, Jenna’s ambition to write her debut novel happened somewhere between training for a triathlon and putting her kids to bed. But it was her determination to follow through that landed her a publishing deal. Growing up, her wild imagination thrived off of reading and her most desired hobby was to let a book completely consume her. Unlike most writers, Jenna never wrote in a diary. She dreaded English class and she never dreamt that one day she would write a novel. Until she did.

 

 

 

Jenna Morland
Website: www.jennamorland.com
Instagram: www.instagram.com/jennamorland
Twitter: www.twitter.com/jennamorland

 

 

 

Author Interview with Megan Tennant and upcoming Book Release

 

 

 

The Official Aletheia Book Trailer!

 

 

 

 

 

AVAILABLE SEPT. 7, 2017

 

 

Aletheia

 

 

Book Blurb

 

The first book in The Seventh River series, Aletheia, takes the young adult dystopian genre to new, and often dark, places. While coming highly recommended to fans of the Hunger Games, Maze Runner, and Divergent, readers will find a gut-wrenching, original plot that dares to stand apart from what is expected of the genre. Brilliant and brutal, Aletheia is praised for tearing deep emotions from even the toughest reader. Whether you enjoy post-apocalyptic, dystopian, or general science fiction, reviewers agree, Aletheia is a must read.

Nearly two decades after the fall, the transcendent city of Iris is the only place rumored to have a cure to the disease that decimated the world. Beyond Iris, are the remnants of the old world, crawling with the Depraved. Infected with Lethe, they no longer remember the people or dreams they were once willing to fight for, and are left instead with familiar voices that whisper dark and unfamiliar words within their minds. Instinct is all that keeps the diseased struggling to exist another day.

Deep underground, below Iris, exists a compound, prison to the Nameless who traded their freedom for the cure to Lethe. It is here that 736 fights to protect those she loves. Not against the Depraved that she’s taught to fear, but against the society that saved her from that fate. She was willing to trade away her rights to regain the ability to form memories, but she won’t let the cult that cured her treat the lives of the Nameless like a resource to be used and discarded. At least, not without a fight.

How much is 736 willing to sacrifice for revenge against her captors? For those she cares about? For freedom? Everything has a cost, what would you be willing to pay?

 

Amazon | Goodreads 

 

 

 

 

 

AUTHOR INTERVIEW

 

 

 

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*Where are you originally from?

I’m originally from Angels Camp, California. A cute little town near Big Trees State Park.


*What’s it like living in Silicon Valley?

Expensive! But other than that, fairly nice. Silicon Valley is very diverse and full of science and art. It’s my kind of place, though cost of living could definitely improve.



*Is anyone else in your family a writer?

My mother has written some published children’s poems and stories, and my father is an aspiring science fiction writer. My brother is a great graphic artist who also dabbles in shadow boxes, but never caught the writing bug.

 

*Did you really spend half your life exploring wild jungles in Costa Rica? Have pictures?

I did, and it was incredible. From the age of roughly 8 to near 16 I lived on the Nicoya Peninsula, surrounded by jungles, beaches, and waterfalls. It was an amazing experience and has fueled many of the more fundamental aspects of my writing. And I do have pictures, which is a good thing, because I might not believe all of my stories if I didn’t have proof.

Costa Rica 3

 

 

Costa Rica 1

 

 

Cost Rica 2

 

 

 

*Why did you choose to be an indie author?

I chose to be an indie author from the very start, before even querying a publisher. For me, the choice was easy and ultimately came down to control. I knew what I wanted my novels to be, and I didn’t want them being twisted to fit into the market norms. A lot of beautiful things are lost from art when parts are carved away so it can fit in a more ‘market friendly’ box. I don’t recommend this route for everyone. But for those who can afford it, and want a high degree of control over their work, it’s definitely something to look into. My partner and I actually started a company (Cloud Kitten Publishing) to publish Aletheia, and we hope to one day soon offer services that mesh the experience and support of traditional publishing with the creative freedom of self-publishing.

 

*How do you personally define dystopian, or Post-apocalyptic fiction?

I believe there are many different ways to define a genre, but personally, what I take most out of dystopian and post-apocalyptic fiction is the way humans handle disaster and immense societal shifts. In both of these genres, we commonly see a society that was once our own but has been forced through a rapid set of changes whether due to disaster, war, disease, power shifts, or a combination. We see societies torn apart, and sometimes rebuilt. In these settings, characters are pushed to their limits and forced into gray areas that test them on levels we don’t often experience ourselves.

 

*Why did you decide to write this genre?

I decided to write my first series in the dystopian genre in part because the idea I had for Aletheia was dystopian by nature, but also, because I’m passionate about the genre. I love to see stories where humans are pushed out of their comfort zone and forced to face and overcome their fears. I love stories where characters are very real and have a gray range to their personality. The dystopian genre contains many of these stories. I also believe that it’s very important to write what you love. If a writer is truly passionate about a story, it will show and make for a better read. Also, writing a novel takes a very long time, so I reserve that level of dedication for genres I’m passionate about. In future projects, I’ll be exploring alien science fiction and fantasy, since those are genres I’m passionate about. But I don’t expect to stray much beyond the three. And you will never find a contemporary novel written by me.

*What is Aletheia about?

In Aletheia, the world has been ravaged by a disease that causes a range of psychotic behavior, but most notably, interrupts the reconsolidation of memories. The latter means that when infected people remember things, the memories aren’t restored, and are thus partially or fully lost. The nature of this disease leads people to try to avoid thinking about the things most important to them, but there’s a catch.

Don’t think about the white bear.

You thought of the white bear, didn’t you? The memories people most try to avoid recalling are the first they lose, leading to a rapid breakdown of their mental well being.This is only further fueled by the voices in their heads, the deep set paranoia, and the very real fact that society has crumbled around them and they can’t trust anyone.

Aletheia starts roughly two decades after the fall of society. The protagonist was infected with the disease as a child, and in exchange for the cure, she traded her freedom to the Prophet, who is the main antagonist. She, along with thousands of other Nameless, are now imprisoned underground, working for the Prophet and the elite city of Iris, paying a debt that can never be repaid. 736 lives like this for a decade, until the game changes and the risks of staying in the compound, outweigh the risks of escape. But plans are underway, and 736 soon meets someone on the outside who promises a chance of freedom, not just for her, but for all of the Nameless. But freedom will come with a great deal of costs, not just for 736, but for those she loves.

Aletheia is all about a very gray and realistic portrayal of a post-apocalyptic world, the costs of survival, and the choices we make when trapped. In Aletheia, you’ll find a diverse cast in terms of ethnicity, sexuality, disabilities, motives, and more. Characters clash and plans Interweave, leaving a thread of difficult decisions that cost lives. In a world where no one can really be trusted, but alliances are the only way to win, Aletheia delves into the nature of sacrifice and victory.


 

 

*Is there a central character or protagonist?

Aletheia is written in first person present tense from the point of view of 736. Our protagonist, 736, is a strong female lead with a murky past. Having contracted the disease as a child, she has no real memory of her time before being infected. Living in the underground compound, and doing the Prophet’s bidding has left 736 stronger in some ways, but weaker in others. 736 struggles with PTSD, guilt, and anger, but she also has a lot of love for those she trusts.

 

*Can you tell us a little about the setting of Aletheia?

Aletheia is set in the crumbling remnants of a city built around science, art, and nature. The compound where 736 spends much of her time is deep underground and made of cold concrete. High above, the land is split between the magnificent, wall encased, city of Iris, and the nature strewn ruins beyond. Aletheia is set in the future, so you will see some slight technological advancements, but after two decades without society, most of the environment is in a state of partial ruin.

 

 

*When is the next book of the series due?

You can expect to see Aletheia’s sequel (The Seventh River #2) out sometime in 2018.

CONNECT WITH MEGAN TENNANT!

 

 

Megan Tennant Author

Main siteAletheia site

Amazon | Goodreads

 

Youtube

 

 

 

 

Thanks Megan!!

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

http://www.audiospy.wordpress.com

Splendid Interview with Fellow Intuitive Author Lauren Sapala

 

LAUREN SAPALA

Author of The INFJ Writer Cracking the Creative Genius of the World’s Rarest Type

 

 

 

 

lauren-sapala

 

 

Lauren Sapala is a writer, writing coach, author of The INFJ Writer, is obsessed with all literature, and my newfound best friend.

 

Welcome Lauren!

 

 

 

 

red-carpet-1

 

 

 

 

*Are you originally from the west coast ? 

I’m originally from Michigan, but moved to Seattle right after college. After a few years there I took off for San Francisco. I had never visited the west coast at all before moving to Seattle, and I had never been to California before I moved to San Francisco. I’m a fly-by-the-seat-of-my-pants kind of girl!

I hear you! Me too! 

 

 

 

 

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*When did you decide to be a writer?

Wow, this might be the toughest question I’ve ever been asked about writing! I don’t think I ever “decided.” I started writing stories and poems from a young age and it was just always something I did. I never had to think about it or choose it. However, I did choose to stop writing, right after my senior year in college when a professor told me I wasn’t very good at it and I should find something else to do with my life.

That’s awesome it feels very natural and instinctive to you, or at least until you encountered a negative influence in college. Sorry to hear that. You’d be surprised how many writers I’ve talked to that had the same experience. I find that very perplexing.

 

 

 

WRITING

“Forget all the rules. Forget about being published. Write for yourself and celebrate writing.” -Melinda Haynes

 

 

 

 

*Who or what influenced you the most in your decision?

There are too many names to list so, in the interest of brevity, I’ll just say: Other writers. Every book I read that spoke to me had a writer behind it who encouraged me to start writing again, and then to keep going.

It’s great to receive encouragement and motivation from other writers isn’t it?

 

 

 

never-stop-fighting

 

 

 

 

*Besides nonfiction, what else do you write?

I’ve written three memoirs and two novels. The first memoir is scheduled for release in Spring 2017.

Oh nice! Yippee! Another book release! Drop me line and I’ll help you with some promotion if you’d like. 

 

 

 

*Why did you decide to become a story coach?

After I started writing again in my mid 20’s I formed a writing group in Seattle and then one in San Francisco. These writing groups were based off of the Alcoholics Anonymous format, meaning: you came and you shared your struggle with writing, but you didn’t have to participate if you didn’t want to, you could always remain just an observer. After the sharing, we settled down to do an hour of silent writing together. I found myself working one-on-one with a lot of the writers in the group, and pretty soon it was eating up so much of my free time that I decided to open a business doing this work.

Nice. I like how those begin. Organically and spontaneously. So glad you started writing again. 

 

 

 

 

coach

 

 

 

 

*Can you name a few benefits from helping others in their writing?

Holy cow, there are so many benefits I don’t know that I could even begin to cover them all! My first and favorite probably is that I get to hear about and share in other people’s lives. Whatever story someone is writing, it always has everything to do with them. I find human beings to be the most fascinating magical creatures, and the fact that other people trust me enough to let me try to help them with their creative process, and sometimes all their inner emotional “stuff” too, is such an honor.

There’s definitely a rewarding social aspect to helping others. Human beings are definitely fascinating magical creatures! Especially the intuitive, artistic types! 

 

 

 

 

*Tell us about your book, The INFJ Writer.

The INFJ Writer is a writing guide based on the real-world experiences of my writing clients. After a year or two of doing coaching work with writers, I noticed that almost every blocked writer that showed up on my doorstep (that is, in my email inbox) was an INFJ or INFP personality type. These writers were highly sensitive introverts who had A LOT to say about the world but no way to get the words out. I saw immediately that they were the same kind of writers who had shown up to the writing groups I formed based on the AA format—scared, creatively paralyzed idealists who were also thoughtful, compassionate, and invested with a deep sense of purpose and passion about art and writing.

They were intuitive writers. And traditional methods don’t work for intuitive writers, as I had found out through my own personal experience, and as I saw my clients finding out, over and over and over again. Outlining, plotting the entire arc of the story in advance, using checklists for character development—none of this stuff worked for intuitive writers. In fact, it blocked them even more from their own inner creative light. That’s when I knew I had to write The INFJ Writer. It’s for intuitive writers who are experiencing blocks and don’t have the money or the time to hire a coach like myself who specializes in working with intuitive introverts. The book contains exercises in every chapter to get the blocked writer’s creative energy moving again.

Thank you for taking the time to write such a book. Although my personality type if not INFJ, I can relate to all of the points that you make here. We’re not too different!

 

 

 

 

just-be-yourself

 

 

 

 

 

*What led you to discover your personality type and what bearings did it have on you as a writer?

I had a desk job for a while where I had a ton of free time and unlimited access to the internet. I had always been interested in psychology so I started taking a lot of online personality tests. Most of them were just for fun, but when I read the description of the INFJ personality type it was like my whole world cracked wide open. Suddenly I realized there was a chance that I wasn’t a completely weird alien (which is how I had felt for most of my life). Finding out I was an INFJ bolstered my self esteem in a thousand ways, one of those being that I finally had the confidence to start putting my writing out into the world.

I could never have a desk job, although I’ve been blogging a lot these days, lol! Wow. You’re story sounds strikingly similar to mine. I’ve only discovered my personality type earlier this year after suffering from a long bout of depression and low self-esteem. But when I read Heidi Priebe’s book, The Comprehensive ENFP Survival Guide, It opened up mines of life changing revelations. 

 

 

 

 

*How much does our personality type affect our ability to learn the craft of writing?

Hmmm…this is an interesting question. I would say that our personality type doesn’t affect our ability at all, but it does affect the way we view ourselves and how adequately we are measuring up to what we consider “ability.” For instance, most INFP writers do not do well with linear structure. When they’re writing, they tend to write in scattered pieces. There IS an order there, but the order usually has to do with a hidden beautiful pattern that the INFP writer follows almost solely according to intuition. From the outside, it might look like a mess. And many, many INFP writers have internalized the assumptions of mainstream writing culture, which says writers should be very concerned with the coherence of the storyline, even in the very first draft. So the INFP writer will see that he’s writing in pieces and get very down on himself for it, and then the negative self-talk comes in and the INFP writer berates himself for not having any writing “ability.” Well, this writer does have ability. His ability just shows up in a different way (especially in that first draft) than it does for most other people.

I should’ve phrased this question differently, but your response is perfect! I can totally relate to this one. 

 

 

 

 

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*How can not knowing our personality type inadvertently affect our writing?

Just like in the world at large, an intuitive who does not know she’s an intuitive will tend to feel crazy or like something is wrong with her most of the time. It’s exactly the same thing in writing. If you write in scattered pieces, or you have a lot of trouble finishing things, or you go through huge amounts of anxiety and emotional turmoil whenever your stories are critiqued, and you don’t know you’re a highly sensitive intuitive writer, the first thing you’ll do is blame yourself. The second thing you’ll do is try to “toughen up” and introduce some sort of harsh discipline into your writing life, which will make you feel worse. Until you learn about your true makeup as a person and an artist—and accept that makeup—you’ll always be caught in this vicious cycle that swings between the inner critic and writer’s block.

This is all very helpful and therapeutic information. Thanks for sharing. 

 

 

 

*Have words of encouragement to all the intuitive types?

Almost every intuitive person I’ve ever met undervalues their own intuition and their own strong intelligence. Use that mind that’s so strong in you! Read everything you can about what you are, and learn everything you can about other people and what makes them tick. The more deeply you know yourself, the easier everything becomes.

I love this statement! I find it very uplifting. Do you have any reading recommendations for personality type? How about your book! 

 

 

 

 

the-infj-writer

 

 

Goodreads | Amazon | Website

 

According to Goodreads

After years of coaching writers who struggled with procrastination issues, high sensitivity to criticism, and crippling self doubt, Lauren Sapala realized that almost every one of her clients was an INFJ or INFP. Using the insights gleaned from these clients, as well as her own personal story, Sapala shows us how the experience of the intuitive writer can be radically different from the norm.

INFJ writers don’t think like anyone else, and their highly creative brains take a toll on them that they rarely share with the outside world. The INFJ Writer discusses such topics as:

How an INFJ writer’s physical health is tied to their creative output
Why INFJ writers are more likely to fall prey to addictions
When an INFJ writer should use their natural psychic ability to do their best creative work

Whether looking to start writing again or to finish the novel/memoir they started so long ago, any writer with the self-awareness to identify themselves as highly sensitive and intuitive will benefit from this book that helps them to find their own magic, and to finally use it to build the creative life that actually works for them.

 

 

Add this one to your TBR pile!

 

 

Reading

 

 

 

 

 

*I’m an ENFP writer. What 3-5 things would you say to this kind of writer?

Oh, one of my best friends is an ENFP! You guys are truly bubbling fountains of light and inspiration…who can very quickly turn into avenging angels when someone has been unfairly wronged. ENFPs tend to experience a lot of guilt because they are driven so strongly by their curiosity that it makes them sometimes abandon projects they cared about a lot or befriend people who can be unhealthy for them in different ways. ENFPs are very, very hard on themselves inwardly and, like all intuitives, they struggle with giving too much to others and not letting themselves receive.

Oh good, make that two of your best friends are ENFP! Tell her I said hi and give her a big high five! Thanks for sharing this. It all rings so true. Never realized how hard I was on myself either. I’m totally Curious George on steroids. 

 

 

 

 

Curious Hello I Am Questioning Interested Name Tag 3d Illustrati

 

 

 

 

I always advise ENFPs:

To follow your curiosity wherever it takes you. It doesn’t matter if no one else understands why you’re drawn to that person or thing. If you’re drawn to it, it’s got something for you.

You’re way more intelligent than you give yourself credit for. ENFPs can come off as bouncy and happy and even a little spacey, but under the surface they are extremely astute observers and very quick studies. Science, math, foreign languages—all of these subjects come naturally to ENFPs who find some emotional reason to get invested in them.

It’s okay to work on a bunch of different writing projects at once. And it’s okay to abandon a writing project if the spark is gone for you. ENFPs are true artisans. They’re like sculptors with words—they like to have their hands on many different textures at once. Let yourself play and explore. ENFPs need to do that.

WOW. I love this. I want to print this out and plaster it on my forehead!

 

 

 

 

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*If you could change yourself which personality type would you pick? Or perhaps, what would change in your cognitive stack?

A few years ago I probably would have said that I wished I was an ENTJ or an ENFJ, some type that still had the intuitive piece but perhaps didn’t share the constant companion of introverted anxiety I’ve experienced for so much of my life. But now, in my late 30s, I’m actually pretty happy with what I was born with, anxiety and all.

What a great answer. I love it. Sometimes I want to be an ENFJ, but I would be a completely different bird. Having that “P” Perceiving function is a huge part of my personality. Thank for sharing.

 

 

 

*Favorite quotes?

One of my very favorites is from Napoleon Hill:

 

“It takes half your life before you discover life is a do-it-yourself project.”

Isn’t that the truth. 

 

 

 

*Favorite writing books?

I love, love, LOVE Stephen King’s Memoirs on Writing. That man is a genius.

That he is. Haven’t read it yet but looking forward to it. 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for joining us Lauren!

 

 

 

 

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Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.thewritingtrain.com

Check out my other site: Mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

Story of the Writer Series: Author Lynda Filler

 

 

Please Welcome Lynda Filler

Author of the  Jet World Series & Target in the Sun

 

 

 

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Glad to have you with us Lynda!

 

 

 

 

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Are you fluent in Spanish?

No, I speak Spanish poorly but with a Canadian accent and say “eh” at the end of the sentence.

I’ve never heard a Canadian accent before.

 

 

Can you share some pictures of Mexico with us?

Lynda dwells in the lovely land of Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco

 

 

 

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Why did you chose to start writing?

I’ve been writing all my life. Poetry in my twenties and my first novel. I tossed it by accident last year preparing for a hurricane!

Oh no! That’s too bad, but it’s understandable given the circumstances! Glad you’re OK.

 

 

 

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How has bestselling author Russell Blake influenced your career?

Now that’s a great question. I think RB personalised the process for me. Because of his invitation I started writing JET Exposed  in Kindle Worlds.  The story was super fun and seemed to take on a life of it’s own. I have three novellas for his World, and two for Toby Neal. As a matter of fact, I may have to write another this year.

Wow. It’s not everyday you have a bestselling author invite you to write books! 

 

 

 

According to Goodreads 

Jet: Exposed (Jet World #) Book 1 

JET EXPOSED, A SUSPENSE THRILLER, UNCOVERS A DARK AND DANGEROUS WORLD OF HIGH-LEVEL INTRIGUE, PASSION, POWER AND GREED

 

 

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The US government is in the throes of cyberwarfare with China. Luke Raven, a high-tech billionaire, is the only man that can save America from the deadly fallout. Jet, a highly trained operative, returns from Kosovo to retrieve two hundred and fifty million dollars in diamonds safely stored in Uruguay. Spotted by a drug cartel, she is chased up the Pacific coast of Mexico where she is saved by ex-Navy Seal Zach, a member of ‘Raven’s Group’.
Luke and his team recruit Jet to help execute a dangerous, highly classified special operations mission that is crucial to national security…Jet completes the critical Team Profile. They take their high-paced adventure across the USA and over the ocean to Paris. The action culminates in Shanghai, China where an ultra-wealthy and ruthless business tycoon possesses highly sensitive information that would have catastrophic results in the wrong hands. But will they get there soon enough to secure the information from their enemies?

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Russell Blake

 

 

 

“A writer should have the precision of a poet and the imagination of a scientist.”-Vladimir Nabokov

 

 

 

 

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What is your goal in becoming a writer?

My goal is creative expression. I want to tell stories that entertain, inspire, create wonder and border on magic. I want my readers to be transported to a place they’ve never been and feel the story as it enfolds.

YES. That encapsulates it perfectly. I love it. I don’t think I could’ve said any better.  Creativity unbound.

 

 

 

 

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Did you write poetry before fiction?

I think I did but I started writing so many years ago that it all blends in for me. I published poetry first The Love Fix in 2009, then Love Rehab 2011 and I (Spy) Love in 2013. Poetry for me is prose in short bursts, sometimes rhyming, more than often stream of consciousness. I wish there was another word for what I’ve written so more people would be inspired to read it. I know they would enjoy my sometimes senseless or emotional or erotic writings.

I began with poetry as well, then progressed to fiction. 

 

 

 

Share two of your favorite poems.

 

Someone Forgot

someone forgot

to rewind my clock

instead my time

is time/warped/locked

is cut in half

is set to explode

when all I asked

was time to reload

the memories

the mistakes to fix

time to love deeply

time to mix

what is soul

important

what is naught

mundane

money chased

now seems so lame

someone forgot

to rewind my clock

Tick

Tock

 

 

The Love Fix

too many have come before you

and left before you

and promised nothing

and in the past, nothing was enough

 

I love these two poems. They really say a lot, especially the second. Words can be very powerful when used to convey meaning, experience or the past. Well done.

 

 

 

 

“Poetry is an echo, asking a shadow to dance.” Carl Landburg

 

 

 

What motivates you?

Love. Love of life, and the amazing men I’ve loved. The Creative Process for creation itself.

Wonderful. You can’t beat love of life! There’s something about the ability to create that’s so exhilarating isn’t’ it? 

 

 

 

 

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What’s your antagonist? Or what’s in the way of achieving your dream?

Time. Never enough time for all I want to create on so many levels.

Ah yes, father time. They say time and tide wait for no man. 

 

 

 

 

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Name three of the most difficult things as a writer.

  • Time to learn to hone ones craft.
  • Time to learn to market ones work.
  • Belief that you are good enough

These are all great opportunities to learn throughout our writing life. You have a great beginning! 

 

 

 

Never stop learning, because life never stops teaching-purehappylife.com

 

 

 

What is it about thrillers that you enjoy?

Oh the fun and the mystery and the thrill of the unknown. When I write I have no idea, even when I plot, where the story is really going to go! Thrillers are only limited in your mind.

I love thrillers too!  The fun, mystery, intrigue, action and suspense all wrapped into one. 

 

 

Have you learned to write from the heart?

Absolutely. My poetry is totally from the heart. And that is both the strength and weakness in my writing, it’s from the heart. If I don’t cry at some point in my story I didn’t get it right.

That’s amazing. I’ve heard several authors say they cry when they write. I’ve definitely been there. It must be the release of passion from us to the page. Sweet isn’t it?

 

 

 

 

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Why do writers give up?

Lazy. In it for the wrong reasons.

Tough love.  

 

 

What would you say to them?

  • If you think you can, you can.
  • Don’t listen to criticism.
  • Write for the love it it, the art of it, not the money.

I especially appreciate your last statement. It definitely rings a bell. Art is beautiful; you never know where it might take you.

 

 

 

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Write for the love it it, the art of it, not the money.- Lynda Filler

 

 

 

 

What’s your next project or book release?

Thanks for asking. My novel TARGET in the SUN is amazing. Great reviews. I thought it was a one-off but favourite readers have been asking me what happens to Carlos and Mia. And what about Sofia and Lucia. Without giving any of the story away, I’ve been surprised by events in several of the chapters. I started with a newspaper story and moved on from there. I LOVE this book VANISHED in the SUN. Pub date expect December 1st.

Can’t wait! Drop us a line when it’s ready!

 

 

THANKS LYNDA!

 

 

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Lynda Filler
Best Selling Kindle Worlds Author, Novelist and Poet

Amazon author page

 

 

 

 

THANKS FOR RIDING THE TRAIN FOLKS!

COME BACK AND SEE US!

 

 

 

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PS

Check out my other site: Mysterythrillerweek for more fun and action!

 

 

 

 

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Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.thewritingtrain.com