Stop Worrying and Start Writing With Sarah Painter & Mark Dawson

 

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

 

television-tuesday

 

 

Stop Worrying and Start Writing (The Self Publishing Show, episode 199)

 

 

 

Self Publishing Formula’s Patreon Page

The Worried Writer Podcast

 

 

Old steam train

 

 

 

 

How to Turn a Struggle Into a Strength with Mark Dawson & Hilary Jastram

 

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

TV Television Tuesday

 

 

 

How to Turn a Struggle Into a Strength (The Self Publishing Show, episode 196)

 

 

 

The Self Publishing Formula

The Self Publishing Show Patreon Page

 

 

freight train

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Get Organized To Write Your Book & Preparation for NaNoWriMo With Kristen Martin

 

 

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

woman  watching  tv

 

 

 

How To Get Organized To Write Your Book | PREPARATION FOR NANOWRIMO

 

 

 

www.kristenmartinbooks.com

www.nanowrimo.org

 

 

Vintage steam train with yellow wagons going uphill in mountain area

 

 

 

 

 

How to Write About the FBI and Get it Right with Jerri Williams & Mark Dawson

 

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

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How to Write About the FBI (and Get it Right) (The Self Publishing Show, episode 193)

 

 

 

 

Self Publishing Formula Patreon Page

LIVE EVENT: Information about SPF Live Event in March 2020

HANDOUT: Jerri Williams Free giveaway FBI Myths and Conceptions

 

 

vintage locomotive

 

 

 

 

 

How to Build an Audience on Instagram with Mark Dawson & James Blatch

 

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

 

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How to Build an Audience on Instagram (The Self Publishing Show, episode 192)

 

 

 

Self Publishing Formula on INSTAGRAM

@Selfpubform

www.selfpublishingformula.com

 

 

 

Old Locomotive

 

 

 

7 WAYS TO FULLY HARNESS YOUR CREATIVITY | How To Boost Your Creativity In Life with Kristen Martin

 

TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

tv old school black cartoon image

 

 

 

 

 

7 WAYS TO FULLY HARNESS YOUR CREATIVITY | How To Boost Your Creativity In Life

 

 

 

 

 

www.thatsmarthustle.com

www.kristenmartinbooks.com

 

train tracks with greenery image

 

 

Thrillerfest 2019 Inside Stories Part 2 (The Self Publishing Show, episode 185)

 

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY

 

 

young man Watching a Movie in his living room with popcorn and remote control, Point of view shot

 

 

 

 

Thrillerfest 2019 Inside Stories Part 2 (The Self Publishing Show, episode 185)

 

 

 

 

Thrillerwriters.org

Selfpublishingformula.com

 

 

 

High-speed electric train with motion blur. The railway passes in a rocky canyon in the forest.

 

 

 

 

 

Tips For Long-Term Author Success With Sherrilyn Kenyon & Joanna Penn

IT’S TELEVISION TUESDAY!

 

 

1950s TV Set

 

 

 

80 Million Books Sold. Tips For Long-Term Author Success With Sherrilyn Kenyon

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Tips: How To Be A Prolific Writer With Bec Evans From Prolifiko

It’s Television Tuesday!

Old Classic Television In A Room

 

 

 

Writing Tips: How To Be A Prolific Writer With Bec Evans From Prolifiko

 

 

 

 

Get back to writing!

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

This is Where it Starts by Author Margot Kinberg

Undecided businessman weighing his choice

 

 

This is Where it Starts

 

Thanks so much for having me here, Benjamin! It’s a privilege. One of the things that many writers struggle with is how to begin their stories. And that’s not just a problem for new writers, either. Even very experienced writers can find that first bit of a story to be a challenge.

There are lots of different ways to get started, and no one way is ‘the right way.’ So, I can just share the approach that’s worked for me. I write crime fiction, and, most of the time, that means that at least one character is going to get killed. The thing is, though, that most of us couldn’t imagine taking a life. So, if a story’s going to be believable, there has to be something about the victim that gives someone a compelling reason to kill.

That’s one reason I start my stories by introducing the victim in some way. I want readers to get a sense of who this person is (or was). Then, I hope I can convince them that this is a plausible murder victim. Starting a story with the victim also gives me the chance to make that character seem like a real human being. This, I hope, invites the reader to engage in the story.

I’ve used different strategies to introduce the victim. In my first two novels, the first sentence of the story takes us into the victim’s life. Here, for instance, is the first sentence of B-Very Flat:

‘Serena Brinkman smiled as she took a deep breath of the crisp October air.’

The next sentences place Serena on the campus of (fictional) Tilton University, where she is a student. Then, she encounters other characters, and readers get a sense (I hope) of what her relationships with those characters are, and why she would become a victim.

In my second two novels, the victim’s basically dead before the story really starts (although in one, the victim dies in the prologue). Those novels begin as the victim’s death is discovered, and the police, as well as my sleuth, Joel Williams, start to ask questions. That approach lets me offer the ‘hook’ of a murder case to the reader, and still lets me introduce the victim as the case is investigated.

There are, of course, lots of other ways to start a story and invite readers to engage themselves. Some crime writers introduce a story with the sleuth. Others start with a particularly compelling setting or incident. I do it by introducing the victim, but there really is no one ‘correct’ approach. As long as the story gets the reader’s attention, that’s what matters.

Thanks again for hosting me, Benjamin!

 

 

Margot Kinberg

 

 

About Margot Kinberg

 

Margot Kinberg is a mystery author and Associate Professor. Born and raised in Pennsylvania, Kinberg graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, then moved to Philadelphia, which Kinberg still considers home.

Kinberg had always been fascinated by crime fiction and mystery novels. In fact, she became an “addict” while still in her teens. So in 2007, she began her fiction writing career with her debut novel, Publish or Perish. In that novel, Kinberg put her experience in the world of higher education to use in creating a murder mystery that takes place at fictional Tilton University. This story introduces Joel Williams, a former police detective-turned-professor, who teaches in Tilton University’s Department of Criminal Justice. In this first outing, Williams helps solve the murder of a graduate student. The second in Kinberg’s Joel Williams series is B-Very Flat, in which Williams helps to solve the murder of a young violin virtuosa who dies suddenly on the night of an important musical competition. Kinberg’s third Joel Williams novel, Past Tense, begins when a set of bones is discovered at a construction site on campus. This case ties in with a missing person case from 1974.

Kinberg, who now lives with her family in Southern California, is currently at work on her fourth Joel Williams novel.

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