Book Review: Elderhaus by Anne Carmichael

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Gertrude spent the better part of her adult life scouring Europe for Helmut Klingenfelter, the father who vanished not only from her life and that of her mother but had forsaken everyone in his past.
With midlife looming on the horizon, Gertie made the decision to stop chasing the ghosts of the past and return to her childhood home of Pitch Pine, where she purchased a century-old house at 1211 Castle Lane sight unseen.
Elderhaus, as it came to be known, had a mysterious past of its own, one that would threaten more than Gertrude’s desire for finding happiness.

 

 

 

My Thoughts

 

 

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There is something about this book that draws you into it’s story. Who is Gertie Klingenfelter? And what happened to her father Helmut? It takes you down a path discovering her roots and mysterious family history. Finally she decides to return to her home town, Pitch Pine.

I found the setting of Pitch Pine with it’s characters to be very endearing ! There’s something about them that sticks out begging you to find out more. Gertie’s family history is heart wrenching but makes the story that much more resonant.

Quality writing with good characters. What else can you ask for? Recommended!

 

 

 

 

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Anne Carmichael

Goodreads | Website | Twitter | Amazon

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

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Book Review: Davenport House Book 1

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Goodreads Description

Davenport House is the first book in a family saga following the wealthy Davenports and their servants in 1915 America.

Mary Davenport is a 22-year-old idealist who worries that the world in the Progressive Era is leaving her behind. She lives isolated in the Pennsylvania countryside with her affluent and secretive family. When her father dies suddenly, Mary becomes pained with grief and increasingly suspicious of those around her.

A humble servant girl has the chance of a lifetime to become a lady’s companion. Costly dresses, exquisite rooms, and fine dinners are pleasant distractions from what is really happening in the house.

 

 

 

My thoughts

 

 

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Page Turner!

This book was a delight to read! It quickly became a page turner as I got used to the characters and sought for answers.

 

Mystery

I really loved that this was a historical mystery set in the progressive era.  Mary’s father died, or was he murdered? The Family saga begins at this point sending poor Mary on a wild goose chase. Very entertaining!

 

Characters

Loved every character. Family drama and secrets made it even more intriguing. I found myself sucked into the story through Mary’s experience, her servant girl and the household. Marie Silk does a great job this. This was a strong point throughout the book. Character interaction and dialogue was superb.

 

 

Can’t wait to finish the second book!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Marie Silk

Goodreads | Website | Amazon

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

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Forensic Lenses: History with Suzanne Adair

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It’s time for another edition of Forensic Lenses

 

An investigative and exploratory approach into the minds of voracious readers everywhere.

 

Today we’ll be spending time with award-winning novelist Suzanne Adair.

 

 

 

 

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WELCOME SUZANNE!

 

Suzanne is an award-winning author of historical crime fiction set during the American Revolution. She is also one of our talented participating authors in this years Mystery Thriller Week  event Feb. 12-22. Don’t miss it!

 

 

Suzanne currently has two series:

Mysteries of the American Revolution series

Paper Woman

The Blacksmith’s Daughter

Camp Follower

 

Michael Stoddard American Revolution Mysteries

Deadly Occupation

Regulated for Murder

A Hostage to Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

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When you read a book, what is your perception? What do you really see?

 

 

We all perceive things a bit differently. The subtle shifts in perception makes all the difference from person to person. The faculty of sight may be the same, however the interpretation and reflection is quite different. Different indeed.

Now come, let us see through the eyes of yet another talented author…

 

 

*Who shaped your reading experience as a child?

Preschool, my reading experience was shaped by my mother, a schoolteacher. After that it was shaped by peers, popular television shows like Star Trek, and the Space Program. (I’m a native of Florida.)

I really appreciate how important early reading experiences are. They help sow the seeds that develop much later in life. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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*Which books had the most impact on you in the early years?

In elementary school I devoured books in the Nancy Drew series. I also enjoyed biographies of women like Sacajawea and Abigail Adams. Later I shifted to reading classic science fiction, horror, historical fiction, and mysteries.

I’ve heard many authors begin with the Nancy Drew series! Sounds like you have a wide ranging interest in books.

 

 

 

 

 

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*How did you develop a love for history?

That didn’t happen until I’d graduated from high school—where I had to memorize dates and details of long-ago battles without much context—and had the room to appreciate Florida’s fascinating history. When I studied history on my own, I discovered how horribly biased high-school history had been. History became fascinating because it was no longer sanitized.

Oh wow. You had quite an eye opening experience. I wonder why history books are biased? I’m sure that would open up a few can of worms!!

 

 

 

 

 

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*Did you read historical fiction or texts in high school?

Yes, I read biographies of people who’d lived centuries earlier. I tried reading historical romances, but although the historical periods often inspired me to research them on my own, the characters did not appeal to me.

Wow. Not too many teenagers read historical biographies. This is rather impressive. If I were to start with biographies it’d be deathly boring. Reading historical fiction would have the reverse effect however. 

 

 

 

 

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*Which books developed your love for science fiction?

Most fiction written by H.G. Wells, Jules Verne, Ray Bradbury, Ursula LeGuin, Robert Silverberg, Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle, H.P. Lovecraft, and Poul Anderson. Andre Norton’s “Witchworld.” Anne McCaffrey’s “Pern.” Marion Zimmer Bradley’s “Darkover.”

Great group of authors!!

 

 

 

*What sources do you read for American history?

In the last twenty years, there’s been a surge of research published by scholars and historians on the Southern theater of the American Revolution. That’s the setting for my series, and in the back of each of my novels, I include a one-page bibliography of those works that were helpful.

Oh good. I hope to get a copy of a few of your books soon. 

 

 

 

 

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*Name 3 of your favorite historical people.

Enheduanna, Hannibal Barca, Dag Hammarskjöld

Yikes. Never heard of these guys. 

 

 

*Name 3 things you hate about American history education.

Only three? Gee. It downplays or omits the successes of the “enemy” while downplaying or omitting American mistakes. It offers almost no hands-on interaction with historical elements, so it’s boring. And you don’t learn specific examples of how history repeats itself.

Now I can smell the bias there. It’s amazing what we willingly omit from the truth. 

 

 

 

 

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*What draws you to the American Revolution?

Religion was losing its stranglehold over people’s thinking as well as the running of governments during that time. Scientific thinking and processes were emerging as acceptable. Women also had more freedoms during the Revolution than they did prior to the war or for more than a century afterward. And with industry gaining momentum, the average person was no longer totally dependent upon handmade items.

Rather intriguing! 

 

 

 

 

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*Besides the revolution what are your favorite parts of history?

I’m fascinated with early civilizations, such as the people of the Indus Valley, Anatolia, and Sumer. However some periods of history I avoid because they’ve been done to death: Tudor, Elizabethan, Regency, Victorian, and recently WW1.

I have interest in the early civilizations as well. Most recently, the early native Americans. 

 

 

 

“History is formed by the people, those who have power and those without power. Each one of us makes history.”-Anselm Kiefer

 

 

 

 

*Name historical fiction authors or books you enjoy.

Ellis Peters, Mary Stewart, Robert Louis Stevenson, Ashley Gardner, Daphne du Maurier.

Thanks! I always love good recommendations. 

 

 

 

*Who are your favorite science fiction characters?

I have a soft spot for many of the characters (guests and regulars) of Star Trek: the Original Series as well as Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Also Lois McMaster Bujold’s protagonist Cordelia Naismith in Shards of Honor and Barrayar; and Maggie Black, protagonist in Terri Windling’s The Wood Wife. And, of course, Princess Leia.

Hard not to like the old Star Trek classics. I love what they’ve done with the new series too. I’m a big fan of the Fringe, Star Wars, 100 etc. The list go on and on…

 

 

 

 

At the Scene of the Crime…

 

 

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*Name 3-5 pet peeves as a reader.

o Breaking a promise to the reader or otherwise not playing fair

o Creating a stupid villain or antagonist

o Dumping in pages of description or backstory that can easily be skipped

o Giving a protagonist unmerited rewards

*If you were a time traveler where would you go?

The future.

One that would bother me the most would be a stupid villain. I personally believe that ruins the entire story.

 

 

 

 

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*Which historical customs would you bring into our society?

o Courtesy and politeness. In my lifetime, I’ve seen people become outrageously rude.

Instead of finding it appalling, society now considers rudeness entertainment.

o A thirst for knowledge. Where have all the critical thinkers gone?

I always enjoy seeing the different responses to this question. Your last response is rather intriguing. 

 

 

 

 

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*If you had to marry someone in the American Revolution who would it be?

It would be someone with many of John Adams’s qualities, but he needn’t necessarily be a patriot. In addition to being intelligent, Adams recognized and appreciated the intelligence of women. He didn’t chase petticoats like Ben Franklin did. He wasn’t a party animal like his cousin Sam, or Paul Revere, or John Hancock. (Wow, get those three together, and they’d drink all your booze.) He wasn’t weird, like Thomas Jefferson was. He also didn’t allow sentiment to derail his logic, demonstrated by his ability to successfully represent the British soldiers involved in the Boston “Massacre.”

Wonderful. I need to learn more about John Adams. I have a  book about him buried deep in my TBR list. 

 

 

 

 

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THANKS SUZANNE!!!

 

 

 

*****

 

 

Bio:

Award-winning novelist Suzanne Adair is a Florida native who lives in North Carolina. Her mysteries transport readers to the Southern theater of the American Revolution, where she brings historic towns, battles, and people to life. She fuels her creativity with Revolutionary War reenacting and visits to historic sites. When she’s not writing, she enjoys cooking, dancing, and hiking.

 

 

Social media links:

Website and Blog | Quarterly Electronic Newsletter | Facebook | Twitter

 

 

 

 

 

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Universal buy link for Deadly Occupation: Click here

 

 

Description for Deadly Occupation:

A wayward wife, a weapons trafficker, and a woman with “second sight”—it’s a puzzle that would have daunted any investigator. But Michael Stoddard wasn’t just any investigator. Late January 1781, in coastal North Carolina, patriots flee before the approach of the Eighty-Second Regiment, leaving behind defenseless civilians to surrender the town of Wilmington to the Crown. The regiment’s commander assigns Lieutenant Michael Stoddard the tasks of tracking down a missing woman and probing into the suspicious activities of an unusual church. But as soon as Michael starts sniffing around, he discovers that some of those not-so- defenseless civilians are desperately hiding a history of evil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for stopping by!!! Don’t be a stranger…

 

 

 

 

 

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Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

Introducing Anya from Elderhaus by Anne Carmichael

 

 

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Anne Carmichael is also the author of the Magoo series, Darby at the Derby, and Polar Opposites. She’s also one of our wonderful authors in this year’s Mystery Thriller Week event. Don’t miss it!

 

 

 

GOODREADS

Gertrude spent the better part of her adult life scouring Europe for Helmut Klingenfelter, the father who vanished not only from her life and that of her mother but had forsaken everyone in his past.
With midlife looming on the horizon, Gertie made the decision to stop chasing the ghosts of the past and return to her childhood home of Pitch Pine, where she purchased a century-old house at 1211 Castle Lane sight unseen.
Elderhaus, as it came to be known, had a mysterious past of its own, one that would threaten more than Gertrude’s desire for finding happiness.

 

 

 

 

Who is Anyaleise Klingenfelter?

 

 

 

 

*Who is Anyaleise Klingenfelter?

Anyaleise Hoffmann (aka Anya Klingenfelter) is the mother of Gertrude Klingenfelter. Anya was born the daughter of a Jewish farmer named Jacob Hoffmann and his wife, Leah Hoffman.

 

*Does her name mean anything?

Anyaleise is a name of German origin. In German the meaning of the name Anyaleise is: Derived from a compound of Anna (meaning grace) and Liesa, which is a German diminutive of Elizabeth (God is bountiful).

 

*What part of Germany is she from?

from Alsace-Lorraine on the border of France and Germany.

 

 

 

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*How did you come up with the concept for Anya?

Right before I awoke on a Saturday morning, I heard the name Gertrude Klingenfelter in a sort of dream. When I sat up in bed, I knew that this is was the day I was to begin my novel and that Gertrude Klingenfelter was to be my protagonist. I started researching the origin of the surname Klingenfelter, which lead me to a town in Germany in the 1500s. It was called Lingenfelter and since people in that time didn’t really have surnames, they were known by the village where they resided. In my book, all of Gertrude’s father, Helmut’s, family spells their name without the ‘K’ to their name. One of the questions Gertrude has in her quest to find her father is why he added the ‘K’to their name when he came to America. [Helmut had been a very secretive man and had never shared anything about his pasts with his wife or his child. As I continued my research on the family name, I found myself studying Nazi Germany and the back-story of Anya’s family came to life. The back story was eventually removed from ‘Elderhaus’ during editing, as the publisher felt it detracted from the evolution of the story. I’m so glad that I’m able to share some of it with you here, as it was very compelling as I was writing it.

 

 

 

 

 

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*What was her experience like in Nazi Germany?

Jacob Hoffmann secluded his family in the hills outside Alsace-Lorraine. They farmed and lived off the land. Only Jacob ever ventured into town to purchase supplies and he sometimes picked up books for his wife Leah to home school Anya. Because they lived on the border of France and Germany, Leah taught Anya French and English, because she hoped someday her daughter would be able to leave the confines of their mountain sanctuary. One day, a strangely dressed man named Isaac who wore a tattered black hat with long curls down each side of his face appeared at their door and spoke in a foreign language that Anya did not understand. Her father, however, seemed to understand perfectly and hurried the man from the door and into the barn. She learned much later, that man irrevocably change their lives and those of future generations forever.

Anya overheard the following life-altering conversation between her father and mother in August of 1948:

“You and Anya must pack your personal belongings quickly and prepare for a trip via a military cargo ship to America. The American leader has signed a law called the Displaced Person’s Act. 205,000 displaced persons and 17,000 orphans are going to be permitted entry into the country and we will be among those immigrants,” said her Father. “In order to immigrate, a displaced person must have a sponsor who is willing to arrange for housing and employment upon arrival.

Perhaps you remember the man called Isaac, the transient, Hasidic Jew who visited our farm some time ago? It seemed he was traveling throughout Europe, as part of a mission trip to find, free and assist other Jews before they disappear, as so many of our brethren have done. Isaac told me the Nazi regime has been capturing trainloads of Jews and hauling them off to concentration camps where they are treated deplorably and murdered in gas chambers. He urged me to take our family and flee Germany.

Soon, their bags were loaded onto the cargo ship in Bremerhaven. After what seemed an eternity aboard the military cargo ship, they arrived in New York.

They spent two nights at a hostel in New York City before Isaac was able to manage transportation for them to Pennsylvania. He arranged work for Jacob at a small carpentry shop in Milford, near Pitch Pine”

 

 

 

 

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*What impact did this have on her?

Anya had been segregated from the community growing up, so she was very anxious to find new friends in Pitch Pine. That also made her vulnerable to people who befriended her for their own agenda….particularly the mayor’s wife, Dottie Franklin. Anya trusted Dottie with her life and Dottie betrayed her.

After Gertie finished college, she left for Europe to try to find her father and get answers to his disappearance. Anya went to work in Polka Dot’s dress shop, which belonged to Dottie Franklin, the Mayor’s wife . One day Dot came in to find that Anya had apparently hanged herself with several yards of silk brocade, but was it really as it appeared?

 

 

*How did this impact her relationship with her daughter Gertrude?

After her Helmut abandoned Anya and Gertie when she was just five years old, she trusted no one, except her mother. She found that animals were more loyal and loving than people and she ‘collected’ every injured or stray animal she found. Old Doc Myers would patch them up and Gertie would care for them until they were able to go back out on their own (wild animals) or she would find homes for the domestic animals.

In later life, her love for the animals lead her to her one true love and her collection of senior dogs is why she named her home ‘Elderhaus’ (which means ‘old house’ in German).

 

 

 

 

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*Who forced her to have an arranged marriage?

Anyaleise was seventeen when her family arrived in America. home-schooled me. Her father immediately set about finding a matchmaker who would choose a suitor for her. since she was almost eighteen years old and nearing an age when she would be considered an old maid.

As luck, or in Anya’s case fate would have it, there was just such a matchmaker right there in Pitch Pine. Her name was Zelda Baasch. Apparently, he had gone to Zelda with a checklist of the attributes he wished his future son-in- law to possess. Ultimately, Zelda returned to him with what she proclaimed to be the perfect suitor. She told him that the young man known as Helmut Klingenfelter was of German Jewish descent with an advanced degree in architecture and a 2nd major in Business Administration. Zelda was forced to admit that Helmut had not been forthcoming in sharing details of his past; but she knew that for so many refugees of World War II, there were memories which were too painful to recall, much less share.

Helmut told his prospective father-in- law, that he wished to raise his family in Pitch Pine. He said he wanted to become the City Planner of the township. He wanted to restore and develop the land and structures originally built by early settlers.

Anyaleise and Helmut were married in June of 1949 and exactly nine months to the day following our wedding, Gertrude Leah Klingenfelter was born.

 

 

*What are some facts about Anya that are not in the story?

Anya was far stronger than anyone ever gave her credit for and that’s not obvious to anyone who hasn’t been there themselves. She stood up to Helmut when she thought he was cheating on her and made the choice to raise Gertrude alone, rather than accept his philandering. She raised a child alone in a time when to do so was not as prevalent as it is today and she was wise enough to build a sizable inheritance to leave her daughter.

 

 

 

Thanks Anne!!

 

 

 

 

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Anne is the author of the Magoo Who Series, which includes Book 1: ‘MAGOO WHO? LIFE THROUGH MY EYES’ Book 2: ‘MAY I BE FRANK’, Book 3: ‘SILENT VIGIL’ and Book 4: ‘MAGIC & MIRACLES: A HOMECOMING’ and ‘DARBY AT THE DERBY’, whose release coincided with the 2015 Kentucky Derby. 

Amazon | Goodreads | Website

 

 

 

 

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Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.mysterythrillerweek.com

 

Meet the Highwaypersons by Geoffrey Monmouth Participating MTW Author

Who are the Highwaypersons?  What are they like? People have asked me about the main characters in my book Highwaypersons: Debts and Duties.   It is hardly an unreasonable question and it is not on…

Source: Meet the Highwaypersons by Geoffrey Monmouth Participating MTW Author

Meet the Fabulous Bestselling Author Marie Silk

 

 

 

 

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Marie Silk has enjoyed writing stories and plays since childhood. She lives with her family in the United States and travels the globe as often as life permits. She is an admirer of history, antiques, and architecture. She enjoys traveling the world, sampling new cuisines, and learning about history.  She has written stories and plays in many genres since childhood.  Marie is the author of the Amazon Best Selling series Davenport House family saga.

 

 

*Where are you from originally?

I was born in sunny Southern California and now live in the rustic northwest USA.

I used to live in sunny Southern California, but I’ve only been to the northwest once.  Can’t wait to go back!

 

 

 

 

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*What sort of books did you read growing up?

I enjoyed reading books about angels, adventure, and history. I also liked the pioneer-type books about survival in early America.

I’m always up for a good adventure. Then history, admittedly my worst subject, has grown on me the entire year! 

 

 

 

 

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“There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them.”-Ray Bradbury

 

 

 

 

*Who were your favorite characters and what did you appreciate about them?

My favorite characters were probably Jay and Lila from Frank Peretti’s YA adventure series. I thought it was neat that they got to travel to amazing destinations.

Hmm…I haven’t heard of them before. I’ll have to look them up now!

 

 

 

*What sort of plays have you written?

The plays I have written are mostly comedy and parody.

Oh wow, I love comedy. I was practically raised by comedians. Guess that’s where I get my funny bones. I’d love to read your plays sometime.

 

 

 

 

“Life is better when you’re laughing”-Unknown

 

 

 

 

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*What are your favorite antiques? 

My favorite antiques include centuries-old furniture like dressing tables, room dividers, and canopy beds.

Cool! I like antiques too. Pottery in particular. There’s something artistic about it that gives you a rich appreciation of history. 

 

 

*What are your favorite historical architectures? 

My favorite architecture is Gothic…not so much the skulls and gargoyles, but the intricate carved detail and stained glass windows!

I don’t know much about Gothic architecture, but I agree with you that it’s beautiful!!

 

 

 

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*Can you describe any significant ones in your stories?

In my first book, the ladies go shopping at Wanamaker’s, which is a real store now known as the Macy’s that hosts the Thanksgiving parades. The building is exquisite!

Oh lovely! 

 

 

*How did you come to love history?

I realized I loved history when I began to travel and visit ancient and historical sites. I wanted to know everything about the sites and the events surrounding them!

That normally does the trick. It probably draws a connection to past cultures, peoples and lands separated by the sea of time. 

 

 

*What are your favorite 3 time periods?

My three favorite time periods to study are Ancient Greece, Tudor England, and the Progressive Era.

Ancient Greece is endlessly fascinating. Tudor England and the progressive Era also strikes a fancy.

 

 

*Tell us about Mary Davenport.

Mary Davenport is twenty-two years old and has lived a sheltered life in the family’s mansion. Her father is her ally, but her mother often degrades Mary and everyone else in the house. When Mary’s father dies, she seeks help and friendship from the servants of the house, the only people she feels she can trust.

I love the historical family saga that you’ve created. It makes you want to know more about them and their culture. Well done.

 

 

*Why have you chosen this particular time period as a setting?

I chose the Progressive Era because there was so much happening in America due to the advancement in technology. I explore the reactions to experiencing cars, telephones, and electricity for the first time.

I’d like to see the look on someone’s face when riding a car for the first time!

 

 

 

 

 

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*What kind of mansion do the Davenports live in?

It is a colonial mansion with many rooms. The family lives in the upstairs bedroom while the servants reside in the level below the main house.

The mansion must be a place of many adventures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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*Tell us about your newest book release.

My newest book is titled Davenport House 6: House Secrets and is a continuation of the family saga as they enter the Roaring 20’s. There are more secrets in the house to be explored that have only been hinted at in the previous book.

Love secrets! Your book covers are fabulous too.

 

 

 

 

 

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According to Goodreads:

 

The family saga continues in this sixth book to Davenport House. It is 1919 when America begins to heal from the Great War and take her first steps into a roaring new Era.

The residents of Davenport House are changing with the times as new fashions and new laws are introduced. Clara turns a blind eye to her troubles at home and plans a grand masquerade ball for the county. Bridget uncovers a distressing truth and returns to the house to warn the others, but soon finds that she is no longer welcome there.

When a suspicious death occurs on the estate, the abundance of motives and sudden hushed lips cause tensions to rise throughout the house. Only the painful truth can set everyone free, but it will come at a price to reveal the house secrets once and for all.

 

 

 

*Does Mary have any sidekicks or companions?

Yes, Mary relies on friendships with her maid and the stable boy, but realizes she wants to have a lady’s companion for deeper friendship.

This makes me more curious to see who it is! 

 

 

*Is it difficult writing and conveying historical fiction ?

I do not find it difficult to write. I take real historical events and create stories for characters to then experience those things.

Wow. Hats off to you for pulling off a bestselling historical mystery series.

 

 

 

 

 

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*Does Mary have a favorite dress or outfit?

Mary is in mourning for her father for much of the series, so she wears a black mourning dress. Other than that, she does not care about clothes very much.

Interesting. Losing family is always the hardest. 

 

 

 

Thanks Marie for joining us on the Train!!

 

 

Connect with Marie Silk

Facebook | Goodreads | Website

 

PS

Don’t miss the inaugural powerhouse event of 2017!!

Check out my other site: Mysterythrillerweek.com

 

 

 

 

 

“It ain’t whatcha write, it’s the way atcha write it.”-Jack Kerouac

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.thewritingtrain.com

 

Author Interview: The Tenacity of Linda Kane

 

 

 

STORY OF THE WRITER SERIES

PLEASE WELCOME LINDA KANE

 

 

 

linda and Shari- cropped

 

 

**********

 

Hi Linda!!

 

Check out her author site : Linda L. Kane

Follow her blog at: L.L. Kane

Connect on Social Media: Facebook @lindaleekaneauthor

on Twitter @llkane2152

 

 

**********

 

 

 

front cover
Light at end of the tunnel.

 

The Black Madonna

 

*I read about your location in your bio. Does living near the ocean help your writing process?

When my bio was written I assumed that I would be living primarily In Pacific Grove, California. Instead, I ended up  living  in  both Fresno and in Pacific Grove. I have many horses, and dogs in Fresno. I couldn’t bare to leave them for any length of time . As to writing, I write in Fresno, in a back bedroom that I have turned into an office. I paint in the garage in Pacific Grove and create ideas for writing while walking on the boardwalk or on the sand with my dogs. I also belong to a writing group in Pacific Grove that are creative men and women.

Wonderful!  I’m picturing you walking along the boardwalk with tons of ideas. 

 

 

 

Jeremylinda

 

                                            Very beautiful horse!

 

 

 

*Are you originally from California?

I am originally from Oregon City, Oregon. Most of my family still lives there. I miss the cool weather, the smell of the trees, and the freshness of the air.

I’ve heard Oregon is absolutely gorgeous, can’t wait to go there one day. 

 

 

 

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What did I study?

I studied many things, becoming an airline stewardess, journalism, reprographics, and animal communication, then I became older and realized that I had two sons with learning disabilities. I saw how teachers out of frustration or lack of training had difficulty working with them and so many other kids. I decided not only to help in the class room, but I became a school psychologist, learning disability specialist, behavior analyst, and I also received a degree in Communicative Disorders and a Masters in Education.

WOW. That’s amazing! You’re quite an accomplished person, and a lot to do with communicating. Now I can understand why you would be a writer. It’s just another way of communicating. Excellent.

 

 

 

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*Which genre do you claim as your own?

The genre that I read the most is nonfiction, historical. What I claim as my own is speculative historical fiction.

I always have a high appreciation for anyone who can write historical fiction. Hats off to you, Linda!

 

 

 

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*Why do you write for adults and children?

That is a great question. I write for me when it comes to the adult books. I finished The Black Madonna, a historical fiction book with romance after two years of research on the Cathars. I write for children because of my background in learning disabilities. The stories provide inspiration in never giving up, whether it’s dancing, math, reading, or conquering your fears.

Very inspiring! You’re truly a multi-talented artist. 

 

 

 

Children Books by Linda Lee Kane

 

 

book 6

 

Katterina Ballerina

 

 

book 5

 

Cowboy Jack and Buddy Save Christmas

 

 

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Matty’s Adventures in Numberland

 

 

 

 

*Who are your favorite authors and books?

Steve Berry, Brad Metzler, Tey, Agatha Christie, Dr. Seuss, the Brothers Grimm, and so many more.

Wonderful group of authors.

 

 

*You strike me as a very expressive person, have you ever written poetry?

I had never really read poetry until a woman I met, Brenda Najamin would read her poetry in a class I was taking. I would take her poems home and pour over them, it was amazing. I do like Robert Frost, I have kept his poetry tucked back in my mind. I love his flow, his rhythm and the stories he tells.

 

I’d bet you’re a natural at it. I got that vibe when I read your bio. 

 

 

 

 

~Poetry is the rhythmical creation of beauty in words -Edgar Allan Poe

 

 

 

How did I come to love history?

Great question. I could give the tried and true answer that if you don’t know the past you’re destined  to repeat it. But for me, there is so much more. I believe that when you see individuals struggle through life, you realize no matter what era you live in, you’re not alone. We all have the same ‘wants’, desires, and compassion.I also like to rediscover people from old books, like Richard III, or Mary, Queen of Scots. The battles, the heroism, and yes, the love.

 

History is my worst subject, so I appreciate anyone who can write historical fiction.

 

 

 

 

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                     This is my brain on history…..

 

 

 

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“We are not makers of history. We are made by history.” ~Martin Luther King Jr.

 

 

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Do I have a favorite time period?

I believe that in every time period there is something that gets me excited, that I want to learn more about. I stumbled upon the Cathars from the 12th century and how the Roman Church persecuted them for their beliefs. I’m reading about the Plantagenets and the Tudors and was amazed to find out that King Henry VIII’s fifth wife, Catherine Howard was only thirteen years old. His reasoning to cut off her head was insane, he probably was by then. How Henry VII won the crown from Richard III, and I ponder who really was responsible for the death of the Princes in the Tower, or did they die? My family is from the Isle of Man and about Illiam Dhone who rose against the Stanleys and captured all the insular forts. Dhone was tried and executed and a famous poem was written about him by Sir Walter Scott. Yes, he is a relative.

 

That’s cool! Can’t wait to read your book, the Black Madonna. 

 

 

 

 

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Why did I begin to write?

I think to chase the demons away, it’s cathartic. Something in every book has a little of me. By writing about it, creating a story I can resolve parts of history and possibly help others with a clearer understanding of that time period, or possibly about themselves, or me.

 

I see a fascinating connection between your desire to resolve something in history, in your past, and your love of history.

 

 

What is my goal?

To write well, to learn, to educate, and possibly with my children’s books, help kids with learning disabilities or life struggles.

Those are all honorable goals. 

 

 

What hinders me?

Nothing hinders me, I set a goal, and I go after it. Every day I write, every day I set a new goal for myself. Primarily it’s to educate. My father always said, ‘You may not be the brightest bulb in the batch but you have tenacity’. I think that’s true of me.

 

YES. “Nothing hinders me, I set a goal, and I go after it.” I love that spirit! A tenacious bulb! 

 

 

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What keeps me motivated?

I believe that I have no choice, I have to share what I learn, I have to educate, and for a personal goal, I would like to be the best that I can be as a  storyteller.

 

I kind of knew this was coming. You’re a very driven person, and you strike me as an overachiever. You can only be the best you at any given moment. Your desire to educate is very inspiring. 

 

 

Why do people give up?

I believe they give up because of their lack of belief in themselves. You can make an excuse like, time, kids, etc. but if you really want it, you toss out the naysayers in your life or the evil demon that sits on your shoulder telling you to ‘give up, you can’t do it. You find a time to write, to go after your dream, you never give up, you never give in. You Just Do It (like the Nike commercial).

 

This is great. I’m seeing the fire of your tenacity here, it’s admirable. Can I borrow some? I see why you’re an educator. You’re passionate, dedicated, focused, driven, and committed to learning. This is also why I say you’re “expressive”. You have strong feeling to communicate, connect and help others. This was evident in the beginning when you said you studied animal communication, became a school psychologist, and even painting and writing. You go Linda!

 

 

What do I say to people who have given up?

Believe in yourself, there is no one but you, and only you will live to regret the choices you’ve made. If you want it bad enough, don’t let anyone or anything stop you.

Therapeutic.

 

 

 

*Can you give us a summary of the Black Madonna?

The Black Madonna is a story of Luci de Foix, a young woman who was orphaned at the age of nine when her parents were killed in a car accident. But the more Luci learns, the more she realizes that there might not have been an ‘accident’ at all. A mysterious group called The Order has been keeping watch over her family line for hundreds of years, and has been waiting for the day when a secret diary will be delivered to Luci, unlocking a code that The Order desperately wants. And when just such a diary is delivered to Luci when she is twenty-nine years old, she realizes that it might be the only way to learn her true family history and the key to her own future. Will Luci be able to figure out the codex in time to save herself and avenge family?
Excellent premise. Whoever did the book cover for this did a great job.

 

 

 

 

front cover
Light at end of the tunnel.

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Frost  wrote a poem called, ‘The Road Not Taken’, I think it’s a must read for anyone thinking of not pursuing their dream.

 

THE ROAD NOT TAKEN

 

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,

And sorry I could not travel both

And be one traveler, long I stood

And looked down one as far as I could

To where it bent in the undergrowth;

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Then took the other, as just as fair,

And having perhaps the better claim,

Because it was grassy and wanted wear;

Though as for that the passing there

Had worn them really about the same,

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And both that morning equally lay

In leaves no step had trodden black.

Oh, I kept the first for another day!

Yet knowing how way leads on to way,

I doubted if I should ever come back.

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I shall be telling this with a sigh

Somewhere ages and ages hence:

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—

I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference.

 

By Robert Frost

 

 

 

What am I currently working on?

I just finished a YA titled Chilled to the Bone which will be out in the next few weeks, a children’s story to help kids and parents with math, a children’s story about an abandoned pony named Clyde. It’s a true story, and I can’t wait for the artwork to be completed. My current book is called Bottoms Up, it’s about the Central Valley, murder, and mystery in the world of fine wine and the competition that goes on.

 

Can’t wait to see what you come up with! Thanks Linda!

 

 

 

Favorite Quote:

Anything by Mae West, she was incredible so I’m not quoting anything profound, or am I?

 

 

Between two evils, I always pick the one I never tried before, or you only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.

 

Here’s another: I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number you get in a diamond.

 

 

 

 

 

 

~Keep writing

and don’t stop

-Benjamin Thomas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Thomas

@thewritingtrain

http://www.thewritingtrain.com